.st0{fill:#FFFFFF;}

BORN YESTERDAY: Our old local band that went from the basement to the attic 🎸 | ITE Ep 15 w/Mike 

 February 3, 2021

By  Is This Entertainment

The talk you should have before starting a band 15 years too late.

We take a look back on our old band from the mid 2000s with our former bass player, Mike, to reminisce about "the glory" days. What it's like to be in a band in Louisville during the MySpace era. 

Listen to Born Yesterday

https://ite.page.link/bYdemo

https://ite.page.link/bysoundcloud

Live Show [Youtube]

Transcript

Okay. Three, two, one, I guess. Welcome. Well, Well, V is. This entertainment podcast. We have a special guest today. Big day, big day. This is a big news. It's the first time we've all three been in the same room.

And, uh , well, I can't say that's what 2000 and we're not in the same room. Yeah. So , uh, we have today a special guest, our former bass player, Michael Kolesar, Sr Mike Kolesar, and , uh, whatever. Welcome back. Okay. Hello, welcome. Thank you for having me. I'm doing great. Thanks for being here. Oh, you know, I had , uh, I had to clear my schedule, like weeks in advance to make sure I was here, but here I am.

Cause you know, we all have so much stuff going on right now in the world. Hey, it takes a while I edit this thing. Yeah, it probably does, but yeah, you make an excellent point. So , um, yes , uh, we all used to be in a band together what, 15, 20 years ago, 40 something like that. Yep. Yeah , yeah, yeah. 15. What is a 15?

W w when did it go? Uh, yeah, 2005 was, was the Gillian show. And I feel like that Mark, that was the, yeah, that was the greatest show. Was that our last shot? Yeah. I I think so. Yeah. We had another one scheduled, but then somebody decided to bail for the show. Oh yeah. Yeah. That's right. It's not talking about that.

Let's be honest. I was one foot out the door already. Oh yeah. I didn't know that you were only one foot in the door in the first place. That's true. Ah, look, I wasn't the best committed band mate. All right. I'll I'll say it. I'll say it, showed up, but you showed up, showed up in your little guitar and song a dance and you played, you performed the hell out of it.

Yeah. Look, I acted a fool and we had a good time. That was fun. Yeah. Yeah. Jacob was the serious one. All the restaurants were like, Hey, we're in a fun band. And Jacob's like, I'm making this my life. Yeah. I was too serious. Is my art. Uh, you guys, are you guys familiar with the shins? Yeah, no.

Uh, I saw them play at headliners. Probably like 2004, something like that. And it, it was like , uh, their main dude. Um, ah, gosh, I forgot his name, but uh, it's like James something. I think he was like intensely serious and there was like three, three minute pause, pause in between every song for him to like do something.

Change the tuning grab a different guitar or something like that in between every single song, the bass player and the other guitar player. And the drummer would just like joke around on the microphone. And I was like, this is a really weird dynamic because this guy over here is very much like , uh, everyone pay attention to my very important words.

And everybody else was like, We can't believe we're getting paid and we're going to drink later. After that album a tour, they put out one more album and then he fired everyone from the band and hired a whole new band and kept the name and just kept going. And I think that's funny. That was kind of an exact replica of what we did.

Cause it would be Jacob never wanted to like do any, you know, crowd banter in between songs or whatever. And always be me saying stupid shit or using stupid shit or whatever. And Jacob would just be all serious. Like I was in a different Bay. We were all in a different band, I think is what, yeah, we, all four of us were in a different band to get a hundred percent, a hundred percent.

Yeah. So , uh, Mike , um, once what I don't know the machinations of, of the band early on. So , um, just real quick before, before we jump into like the BYU specifically, what ma what made you want to be in a band? Okay, well , um, That's a really stupid question for me because it's, I , uh, started playing music because I was going to be in a band and not the other way around.

Um, So what happened was, is at the time , um, so I, I was thinking of born yesterday in three parts. There's part, a part B part C part a is all Jacob. Jacob was doing his own thing called born yesterday for awhile. If I'm not mistaken , right, Jacob,

excuse me. I was playing on my own with , uh, like just acoustic at the open mic at twice told , um, and recording music. You know, I had just gotten out of a recording school and came back home to Louisville. And , uh, that's where I met up with Ryan who is a great songwriter and , uh, He was playing at the open mic too.

And that was actually at the beginning was me asking Ryan. So there wasn't. Okay. So I guess there's only okay. We'll call it that part a then. So the fit, my scheme , um, So I was in part B part B is when a born yesterday actually became a full band instead of just Ryan and Jacob. And , um, I, at the time I had a guitar, I didn't play the bass at all.

And Ryan said, Hey, I'm in a band and I play the bass, but we really want a basis. Do you know how to play the bass? And I'm like, I don't, but I know how to play the guitars. I'm sure I could figure it out. It's the same thing with less strings, right? And so I went and got myself a bass and started playing the bass.

And then literally the only time I've ever played the bass was when I was in born yesterday. So, and I wasn't very good at it. Yeah. Like I didn't , like, I couldn't sit up if you had me like go on on the stage and like jam with other musicians. I couldn't do it because it was like, I only know how to play born yesterday, as long as, I don't know, I think we were all like Stripe seven nation army is the only real musician.

It's Ben who could actually probably jam with somebody else. Like we're not those kinds of musicians. Yeah. Um, so wait , so, so , you knew Ryan before the band. I went to high buddies, Ryan. Ah, gotcha , gotcha, gotcha. Gotcha. Okay. And in high school he didn't even play the guitar for a long time.

He only played the piano and he , uh, he's one of those guys that never actually had any formal training. You just put them in front of an instrument and like two seconds later, he's just playing all kinds of crazy shit. Like he's one of those natural musician types. Yep. But he also was. Like , he, he didn't really think of himself as a musician for a while.

He thought of himself as a writer. So he wrote poetry. And when I say poetry, like thousands of poems , like, and he would just turn those into music. Like if he, he should have just, instead of becoming like a, like a musician front man type of person, if he probably probably could have. Work down the career of being a songwriter for like other bands and stuff, because he just had this massive catalog of music that he had written and you could go through, he'd like have binders like this thick and you could flip through it and be like, Hey, what's this song.

And he would instantly remember, Oh, that song. And he would just start playing it. Cause like he knew it, like he didn't have the music written down or anything. He just knew every song by what it was. Yeah. He was ridiculous in the hundreds of songs. Yeah. He could, he could probably do something like even now, Ryan, if you're listening for some reason , like, you know, Probably do something in Nashville or something, you know?

There's Oh, there's careers for songwriters like that. Do you got a lot of talent? So, yeah, that's how I got in the band. It was just literally a, Hey, we need someone to play the bass. You want to play the bass? And I'm like, yeah. Okay. I'll play the bass. And we had a drummer too, that came in , uh, Ben. Lovely.

Yeah, but I think we met him. Did we meet him there too? As well at twice to old, the old copy. Copy shop. I think he joined the band not less than a month before I joined the van, but how do we find Ben? I think was that how we found I met him. I don't, I don't remember. Cause he was already there. I think he was a guy that just came into twice total.

I wish I could remember. I think that's what it was though. I think he played guitar at twice sold and saying, yeah, I think so. And then you found out he was a drummer and he's like, Hey, we need a drummer. And he's like, okay, I'll play the drums. Yeah. He was fun. He was, he was cause he was in another band where he played the guitar, something crazy, like way better than born yesterday.

He was, he was like a real guitar player. Yeah. Um, Yeah. We had, so we had a combination of songs from Brian, like a select few picks of Ryan songs that like worked with the band dynamic. , uh, and then songs that I had written as well. It was kind of how I think it started.

And then , uh, later Ryan decided he couldn't do it anymore. I actually banquet first. Right? The other Ben , well, Ben went to grad school and so he, I think he ended up going to UK. And so he's like , well, I'm leaving. And so I'm going to Lexington. So like , well, he can't do that. How I ended up playing drums that one time , um, I think.

No, because that was really kind of early in our career. I think it was just that something was wrong. And Ben had a thing where he was going to be out of town for a week, but we had already booked the show. So it was like, we didn't want to cancel the show, but we, you get a drummer

and Jacob's like, I got this friend, Ben, he plays the drums do you play the drums? I can fake it enough to that was that , um, Oh, that place on fourth and Oak the Rudyard Kipling. Yeah. Yes. It's still there. Yeah. Is it still there by? No, no, it's not. I mean, the building's still there, but it's not the rut anymore.

I think some, I think some like development, people bought it and we're going to do some stuff, but , um, I believe it's, I believe it, but that place had a weird vibe about it. You remember? I always, I always felt weird. Literally the , the, the , the, the corner that has the highest crime is fourth and Oak. Okay.

So some negative energy dynamics. Yeah. Yeah. Okay. Yeah. It's it's not, I wouldn't call that a super fun, safe neighborhood to be in. I always just felt really strange. Yeah. Like I don't even really have words for it, but. I don't know. How does the building itself was pretty cool. I like, cause they had like a little restaurant part and like a bar and then they had the room with the, you know, the music set up and then they have like another room over here.

Yeah. It was a nice venue. It was just in a bad location. It was close. Like just like the dynamics of the restaurant bar vibe with whatever was happening in the performance. The business never knew exactly what it wanted to be, but I feel like that's also because it changed ownership like a handful of times.

That makes sense. That's probably true. Cause I feel like I remember, I think a lot of people would just go there to eat because it was mainly a restaurant and it's like, why are people playing music over there? It's like, yeah, it's loud. I don't like this. Whatever, whatever food they started.

I don't remember hummus. They had hugs drinks though. I remember their drinks being been great. I mean, I've never met a bar with bad drinks, to be honest. So yeah. Just saying I was just, I remember flying there. Yeah. So , so, so Ben left and then pretty soon thereafter is when I think, no, we had a replacement, we got black men to play drums.

Um, and then it was, it was black men and Ryan in the drum or in the band at the same time? Yeah, not for very long though. No, no. And I don't know if that had anything to do with why Ryan left or if it was just me like being a control freak or, or what, so. I think it was mostly you being in control. That makes sense.

Yeah. I always felt bad about it. Like, I felt really guilty about it later. Like , well, I mean, I don't feel like Ryan really was super excited about the kind of music we were trying to play. He wanted to be more like the singer songwriter and he didn't want to play. Whatever kind of rock music, I guess I always call it alternative rock, but, you know, I feel like he wasn't as into the style of music we were trying to make and that's part of the reason why he left.

, I don't know. I felt bad because I didn't, I didn't support his music. Uh, you know, as much as I should have, you know, cause he's, he's super talented and I really should have gave him more props for what he was doing and his contributions. So Ryan could there, I appreciate you, man.

That's all I'm saying. It sounds rocked. Yeah. Yeah. Great. You know, even if that wasn't his main jam , uh, yeah. Like his stuff was, yeah. I, I enjoy playing Ryan songs more than the mine.

So, so that, that , uh, you know, I remember from my perspective, I had. Gone off to college in Texas. And when I came back, Jacob was. Telling me like, Oh, you gotta, you gotta sit in with us. Like, we're doing some stuff. Um, maybe we could roll with two guitar players , um, plus Jacob playing guitar as well, you know?

Yeah. I asked you , before Ryan even quit, I asked you right. Right. Right. And, and like , uh, and I think we had even talked about it for a minute when I like played the drums that one time of like, okay, maybe this one, it would be like the way to like springboard into something , uh, where I joined up and then, you know , uh, but I didn't want to step on Ryan's toes either.

Cause you know , like, you know, he's good dude. Um, so , uh, and then plus I was going to U of L and doing all kinds of stuff there. So, you know, I wasn't in a place where I felt like I could commit to anything. And then , uh, and then like slowly that kind of whittled away. And, you know, we found a way to make it happen.

Um, But by then Ryan was gone. So, , what's weird. Uh, I remember having like a rehearsal with some like random other drummer. Oh yes. And he was only there for like a day or two. I think I remember that. I feel like, Oh, we tried. And that guy was, and another band that played. Cause I think we were.

Where we, Jacob, and I think we're working at tech world at the time. Yeah. And this guy was in one of those bands and Ben lovely. I think he had said he was leaving because he, he was gonna, he was gonna leave like the town permanently, but in the, between him leaving town and him leaving the band, he was going to still play guitar for his other band for a couple of months.

And so he was leaving to go do that and we needed a drummer. Cause it was another one of those situations where we were, we have a show booked and we don't have a drummer. So we got to get somebody to come in. And the thing is, our songs are not ridiculously complicated play. It's not like rush or tool or anything like that where we're crazy time signatures.

Yeah, exactly. Okay. All our songs are in like seven 16, so it's going to be like, no, that's not like that. Our songs are all just got to beat and you can. I guess yeah, yeah. To tap your feet and stuff like, Hey, there's a picture. That's the tech world. Oh, Hey, that is tech world, right? Yeah. Is that us playing or is that just some random we're in a band, but uh, this venue was like the coolest venue , like.

It had the shortest ceiling ever though , like, you can't really tell from this picture, but if you're standing on the stage at tech world, you can put your hand Palm, like flat up against the ceiling like this. So from the stage, yeah, it was from the stage. It was , uh, all ages venue. It was an all, yeah, they had beer.

They had beer. Right. But they had certain nights where it wasn't all ages, but they did a lot of all ages shows a lot more than any other venue. I remember in Louisville. Yeah. It was so fun working there. And that's like, where I was introduced to like a lot of, you know, heavier music. That's where, where we've, where I found sub method, which is like still one of my favorite things to listen to.

Oh yeah. That's right. You remember? A lot of national shows come through there. Like a lot of it's, like you said, it's like harder metal type stuff. So I didn't know. That's why I always felt a little out of place there. Yeah. They had nights where I remember they would have like their punk nights and then they would have their metal nights and then they would have their just general rock nights.

They had a lot of just regular metal though. Like, and I remember, you know, I'm not going to disparage anybody's music, but we had a lot of shows Jacob, cause Jacob would do the sound and I would do the, I would run the light board and it would just be for bands where every song was.

on that. And I'll say this is the same. Yeah. Yeah. It was just like a barrage of noise. Cause they had a really decent sound system and it was loud. Yeah. Um, But they would come in and just be like, okay, we're called a death of death or whatever. And then it'd just be like, . And I would just sit there on the light board and just like hit presets with my head earplugs and just kinda like, you know, it's sad.

It's like, some of that music is like, so technical. So like you would never know that they were playing like a million notes perfectly because it just comes out of the speakers as you know, just white noise. Um, but yeah, and then here we come, playing, waiting for the rain. Exactly. Uh, I remember, you know, a long time ago I went to a, what was it?

Oz mist. And some of the bands were like that, you know, in your, in like a shine arena or whatever. And it, it, I, the band, I remember sounding exactly like that was Slipknot and I know slip nod is, you know, they're not bad, I guess. But they that's exactly what their show sounded like. You couldn't, you couldn't hear any differentiation between guitar or vocals or anything.

It was just static. Like, like that's all you heard from the speakers for like 45 minutes. And it's just, I don't understand people that are like that. I mean, speaking of hardcore bands, Ben's brothers in , uh, was in a, what was the name of the surviving thalia? Yes. Diane nemesis. That's what it was. I remember him.

Yeah. Yeah. They were, they were tight. They were great. Yeah. Shout out to you individual notes. I remember that. So, yeah, I think that's , uh, that dynamic led to what I think was the greatest joke we always did, which was right before playing like , um, either like waiting for the rain or , um, Oh gosh, what's that one song.

Uh, bap , bap, bap , bap, bap , feel, feel, yeah. Yeah. Uh, where we will be like this next song is called jeez, Rob clean D chord. Yeah. There was a little bit of boom, but yeah, we did we some split. Yeah. Right. Look, some of our songs definitely had like some kick to it. Um, but. I just really enjoyed that joke specifically, right?

Yeah. Cause I mean, cause we would play shows, especially when we would play it like tech world or something like that . Like, you know, when you, when you're playing, like trying to get four bands together on a ticket, you're trying to get good bands that don't necessarily sound exactly the same, but kind of flow together.

And there weren't a lot of. Other bands to choose from. That sounded like we did, you know, cause we couldn't play. Like, it'd be like three of those hardcore metal bands in than us. And it would be, people are like, what the fuck? It says, people are leaving like halfway through the first song. Like I came here to hear people yell and what is this?

You know? Well, we were like , like, I feel like that was kind of one of the biggest detriments for us. And what's weird is like wanted to do more of that. Like I wanted to scream more and do more of that stuff, you know, but I didn't know how to write that music. You know. Um, but yeah , uh, and we started getting there, like with Envy and things, you know, it started to get heavier.

Um, but for the most part, we were like , all, all, turn it up, pop. If anything, like. Yeah. I think like my, my musical influences at the time, I mean, I was listening to a lot of just like in life during that time, I was probably listening primarily to Dave Matthews band, Jimmy eat world. Yeah, those are probably like the top two with, you know, obviously I was always listening to the Beatles that's always happening.

Um, and then like Weezer. Um, perfect. So, so yeah, but I've, I feel like in my mind, in general, I wanted to, to do more like acoustic II, like Dave Matthews band stuff, but then at the other end, like more like weirder Sonic stuff with like Jimmy world. Um, And , uh, not so much in like the, in the emo realm, but definitely with more, just like playing around Sonic with like, just, yeah.

Yeah. Just like more, more interesting stuff from my like notes standpoint, there's two guitars, bass and drums. Or at least just like getting like really into like some like effects, you know, and like playing around with just like , um, not so much like looping, but oops. You know what I mean?

On a side note, you and me are starting to do that a little bit. I think I could be wrong, did you listen to the new song that we did, Mike? Oh, no, I completely did not look at it, but I will listen to it today. I promise. I promise I will. Well, if you've listened to the podcast, it's the intro.

Oh, okay. I haven't actually listened to your podcast. I've only heard like little clips of it on Facebook . He's going to have to listen to this one. It's funny. So , um, dimension. Oh, we were speaking of Beatles influence. Like we did a whole podcast on that as well. So , uh, Oh, I'll have to go back and listen to it.

Yeah. We post we post , uh, Sergeant pepper versus Pearl Jam's 10, which one is a better album, which is an argument that should never be made. No, what's your vote? I mean, On 10 over Sergeant peppers. Are we talking about better as in, uh , just, just overall a better album or more influential on the face of music?

Because I don't know if you could even answer that second. Which one do you like more? I probably like Sergeant pepper is better. To be honest. If I had to pick which one I've listened to more, I would go with Sergeant Peppers. Um, Yeah, not to say that, but yeah. That's like , you're, you're trying to argue, you know, who's a better Michael Jordan or LeBron James they're, you know, it's kind of hard to pick one.

Although people argue about it all the time. Oh, I don't know how common that argument is. Yeah. It's super common, but you don't do sports. So I meant, I meant Pearl Jam vs a a a , uh, the Beatles. Oh, tan versus Sergeant Bevers. Yeah. And I don't think I've ever had anybody ask me that specific question before. So that's why , uh, when I, when I brought it up to Jacob, it was like this, this will be a fun topic because it should be, you know, 10 versus nevermind or

Yeah. It should be like Sergeant pepper versus pet sounds, but right. Yeah, let's take two things that should not be put up against each other. Oh, you should do a nevermind versus pet sounds one now. Oh, God only knows. So you guys have pet sounds is way more depressing than I was anticipating.

I've listened to it all the way through a couple of years ago for the first time in forever. And you're right. It's kind of a sad bastard kind of. I love it. It's so good. I was like, Oh gosh. I mean , like, , my, my beach boys knowledge not there. Right. Um, so yeah, I had to like go back probably like three, four years ago and I was like, I'm going to make a conscious effort.

And I listen to pet sounds all the way through a handful of times. Um, just, you know, just to really kind of dive in. And it's so good. There's some real melancholy in there and yeah, it's pretty rad. It's pretty rad. That was the number one takeaway when I heard it again, I was like, God, this is sad.

This album is sad. I haven't listened to it again. I haven't listened to. Okay. I haven't listened to those in forever, but , uh, you guys had some of the same influences when we were in the band together. Uh, that's probably true. The Jim, Mike, what are your top three influences world? Jimmy world is number one.

My favorite band of all time. You did not know that. Yes. I mean, I had an inkling. We always did that. If you miss, then we did play that song. Didn't we, I wouldn't know. It was like transitioned into some other songs. But it was the screaming of though. Yeah, exactly. Um, if I could have joined like a Jimmy world, like tribute band at the time, I totally would have.

Cause their songs are just, they're so good. They really are. And I've only seen them live one time in my life and it makes me sad because , uh, and I'll tell you about it real quick. It was at Bogarts up in Cincy and it was the 10th anniversary futures tour. Hmm. And so this is more recent. It was more recent.

Yeah. So it was God like six or seven years ago. Maybe, maybe not even that Bogart still there. Do you think? Um, I don't see why they wouldn't be, they were there. They're one of the hot places in the region of the day. It's a big room. I've been there for a couple of shows.

We saw GreenWheel there one time we went together. Yeah, that was fun. I mean, they're, they've got a big, lower level and then they've got like a big upper deck where you can stand. That's got like a full bar and everything. It's a pretty decent sized venue. Okay. What'd you say? Like headliners, headliners.

I'd say it's bigger than headliners, but not by much. They have blinders on a quarter. Kind of more along the line of the old Jillian's probably about that big. So maybe a little bigger. I don't know. I can't really tell in my head the spatial dimensions isn't there anymore, but they were, they were awesome.

Oh no. Jillian's that, that building has been so many things. And now I don't know if they're even anything. The one in Louisville. Yeah. The one in the wall. It's diamonds pub that's right. Yeah. Okay. Cool, but the other diamonds is still there. Right? The one in St. Matthews, I think so. So , why do you think you'd like to meet world so much?

You know what? I don't know. It's hard to imagine, like music clicks with me. Like I'm not, I'm not a super deep listener with music. Like I'm not looking for music to, you know, make me feel well, you always look for music to make you feel a certain way, but I'm not like looking for super deep meaning behind the lyrics, not to say that Jimmy world doesn't have.

Deep meaning by their letters, maybe they do. I'm just not the kind of person that goes and tries to seek it out. It's not my, Oh, this music is really speaking to me in this very specific way. And it's, I just, I've just liked, I like their, I like their groovy tunes, man. You know, that's kinda just how it was.

Yeah. Um, I feel the same way about foo fighters. I really like foo fighters. And I think Dave Grohl is the first one to tell you, he's like, I think I saw an interview with him even where he said something like our songs don't really have any meaning. Like people would come up like, Oh, your songs were so meaningful to me.

And he's like, that's weird. Cause we just kind of thought it sounded good. And we wrote it and we played it and that was good. So I think they've gotten more as they have gone. Speaking of food fighters, there's the longer they've gone on in a career, they've gotten a little bit more. I don't know what word I'm looking for here, but their music has definitely changed.

It's not just the hard rock, like it used to be, you know, back with Everlong and you know, the color and the shape album and all that. But , um, I don't know. I just like music. That sounds good. More than anything more than, you know, whether it's meaningful or not, which is why , uh, Jacob, you know, I didn't like me very much because Jason Bourne yesterday songs are so deep and meaningful.

I would say they were not deep in meaningful. I would say they were all about breakups. That's true. Um , as, as it were already halfway to being an emo band. Yeah. Well then the heavier stop that I was starting to write, I think was getting deeper, but yeah, we didn't quite get there. I don't think.

My musical influences obviously were , um, you know, we covered them in the podcast a little bit with , uh, Pearl jam. That was a huge influence for me. And, um , Uh, actually Hootie and the Blowfish was, was a big influence. And I think that's probably where like the cheesy songs kind of came from.

And then , um, you know, and then as it progressed , uh, what was , uh, what was that band that I always say I was stabbing westward. I don't know why I love that sound, but it just sounds so cool to me. Like just sonically, there's that kind of a nine inch nails? I think, I think part of, part of the issue.

And this is all, you know, coming to my head right now. But if we had potentially been a little older or if there was another Avenue, I think we, I think we naturally drifted toward the heavier, like trying to make our stuff heavier than maybe it should have been for two reasons, one playing at tech world.

And that being the place where the all ages shows. You know , and, and early on, cause I feel like as tech world kind of drifted, we started playing the twice, told out in Oldham County more and I feel like our , um, our pop alternative vibe was, was more appreciated out there. Right, right. Um, and then, and then I think, I think Ryan's writing style.

With, like how fantastical, it was also lent itself to maybe having like a harder edge to it in that like , uh, fantasy metal kind of way, you know, like , um, like it's not full blown, like hero's journey songs, but it's, you know, some of that stuff was like Epic. Yeah, Epic in nature. So , so, you know, had some of those things not been there , like, would we have drifted toward more of that fighters or lower?

Yeah. Like, and then once we started playing, then emo came in real hard. So you know this, when you started to dashboard . Yeah, we were, we were almost on the verge of being emo trendsetters, but we just didn't quite get there. Right. Weren't pretty enough. No, just hands down. And our drummer wanted to be in a punk band, right.

Basically. Yeah. It's your story? So. You know, all four of us were in different bands. Hmm. That sounds like you two could have been in the same band. We were, I mean, as far as goofy people go, right. Mike and I were, were I think, more closely aligned, which had been in like bare naked ladies together or something.

Yes. Yeah. Yeah, definitely. Definitely. I just remember there was a couple of times where I would just like be jumping around like an absolute fool. In the middle of the song. And then afterward Jacob would be like, did you know that song is about like death or suicide or something like that? I kind of really I'm , uh, I'm up there.

They're like smiling and jumping around and stuff. And then I'm like, Oh, that does. My vibe did not fit where that went. I wasn't, like, we didn't have a very contained image as a band. Just kind of, kind of all over the place. Yeah. If we would have just had this meeting before we started the band, I think we'd in a lot better.

Yeah. Yeah. Let's go back in time, back 20 years. We could figure out what we wanted to do. I was speaking of music, what are you listening to now? Same. Yeah, I kind of just listen to the same stuff. I mean, Oh God, if I had to pick, I don't even, I couldn't even name a newer band that I'm listening to.

Um, I listened to DJ X a lot in the car because my daughter really likes it. So I hear newer popper, like top 40 type stuff all the time, but I couldn't. Identify any of the bands or anything like that. I'm just like, okay, this is fine. I guess. On my own. I'd listened to, Oh, I have a Spotify playlist.

I call ultra mix and it's Scott. A couple of thousand songs on it. And it's stuff from the nineties. It's stuff from the eighties, it's stuff from now from the two thousands, it's just an amalgamation of shit. And it's 95% stuff. I've listened to my entire life. And that's kind of just my go-to , uh, Spotify list.

So if you, if you want to hear Mike's , uh, Spotify playlist, just type in Ulta mix. Well, I'll have to share it. I don't think I have it shared, but I'll , uh, I'll make that available in public and I'll tweet it. I'll tweet it out on my, yeah. Tweet it because , uh, because your Twitter, there is a fake kolesla, one word I know.

And , uh, and then people can listen to your playlists. I'm a terrible social media user. So don't expect tweets every day. No, no, but I mean just for this purpose , uh, yeah, right. And then, and then to , um, Ben, you were saying, what are you listening to these days? Uh, okay. So let's see. At this point for me too.

Um, it takes a lot to introduce a new band or a new album into the mix and have it stick , um, in the last couple of years , uh, you know, Derek and the dominoes, Laila and other songs, other assorted songs and things. Technically what the album's called. Um, it is so depressing. Uh, and it's basically the album he wrote for George Harrison's wife , uh, to try to convince her, to leave George Harrison and get with him. Uh, so that's why it's, it's , it's, it's the most , like, you know, 20 something year old in love with his best friend's wife flag, rip your heart out and be led.

But will you love me? And it's it's, it's just it's yeah, it sounds to me like that should only be one song at the most. And this guy. Yeah, no, it's definitely like , uh, I'm going to fly down to Miami and, you know, put this, put this band together and do this album and then , uh, like party and be sad about the situation.

So that album has , uh, is one that , like, I just had been, you know, I have known about it growing up and. I had never listened to it from beginning to end until a couple of years ago. And I was like, wow. So any new music or just a dirty projectors, 30 protectors you've heard of dirty projectors.

You heard? Oh, I mean, they've been around a long time. Uh, but they , uh, they started to get popular. I feel like around like 2010 , uh, in the like Brooklyn area. Um, I mean, it's kind of like alternative ish. No, it's more like indie indie rock. Um, they used to have these two vocalists , uh, so it's mainly this one dude.

And , uh, he plays guitar and sings. He's a very interesting guitar player. Like there's like a, there's like a staccato kind of nature to his guitar playing. That's really interesting. Um, and, uh , Um, and he had these two vocalists , um, who these ladies were amazing. Uh, they were on the Roots, picked them up and put them on one of their songs , um, for one of their albums and like 2012, something like that.

Um so they're two voices plus his, and then they had a third voice , uh, this lady who was playing keyboards and just like the mixture of all their voices was great. So they put on an album called bit Orca , uh, around 2010. That's awesome. And then about like six months to a year later, they put out like an E P with Bjork.

Called Mount Wittenberg Orca. That is phenomenally good. It's so good. Um, it's weird though. Like you have to listen to bit Orca first to get a sense of what's going on and then listen to Mellon versus like a concept , um, kind of it's it's basically like the, the. That EP was written for like specific kind of events to like save the whales or some crap.

Um, and , uh, so it was more of a, it was like, it was put together for this live thing. And then they were like , well, let's just record it too. And, or at least that's how I, I think the story went. Okay. Those two ladies have since left the band and there's some new vocalists in , um, but the dudes obviously still there and their new stuff is, it rocks too?

Like it's vocally. Very interesting. It's a lot of fun. Cool. Yeah. And then , uh, you know, Beatles, Radiohead, Allmen brothers, and , uh, occasionally a little John Coltrane. Okay. So like you guys are like, so bream love, so preen kind of listening to the same music. Kind of, I mean, I'm not listening to Coltrane well , so,

okay. Well, I don't listen to music that often, but like I've been listening to like even harder stuff, like tool and , uh, breaking Benjamin recently, like a lot , um, Yeah, like tool just came out with an album called and knock you list or something like that. Like before all of this break right before all this stuff hit.

So it's just like, it's creepy and weird and awesome. And like, those guys are so talented and make music in like the complete opposite way that I make music, where they like, you know, practice and make the song a hundred percent perfect and different time signatures and all this stuff. And then they record it live, you know , um, Which is like the opposite of how I'm making music now, or we are, where are you even making music?

Can we just record something and then loop it and hope it works? You know? So , uh, yeah. Go to some of these pictures , pictures, pictures. Okay. Uh, so this was just the venue. This is , uh, the venue. We started playing at a bunch cause we worked there , uh, which was pretty fun.

This has been, we rehearsed and my family's attic , uh, which was, I think this at the time might've been my bedrooms.

It had a bed in it for awhile. I don't remember. I think you moved to the basement. Yeah , yeah, yeah. I remember the first show, the first sister out of her room a couple of times. Yeah. That seemed to happen a couple of times. Yeah. I remember I think the very first practice cyber went to this was before Ben.

It was in the basement and that basement is so small. I can't believe we could get a drum set in there, you know? Right, right. It was a terrible room and it was, it was a weirdly like narrow and long. And so it was not an ideal place to play music. Like we couldn't stand together, stand around the corner.

Yeah. While we were practicing. So that was a weird space. That was fun though. I remember, I think , uh, there's a song I wrote down there in the basement that , uh, we never played. Uh , Hmm, let me, and I don't know, last time did we ever play last time?

Cause he was like, I remember recording it with you or something. That name sounds familiar for a song. Yeah. It was like, it was like a, it was like an edge we ever played it. Like, it was like, yeah, it was like an edgy emo pop song, but like we never played it. Yeah. Uh, there's a Koleslaw at the tech is that tech world looks like, yeah, that's a tech world.

Yeah. You can see the, the Cielo ceiling. Oh, right. Yeah. The drop ceiling. Yeah. That was , uh, I really liked, I liked plaque then, you know, I really liked playing there because the sound system was so great. You know? Yeah. The sound was great there. Uh, this is, I liked the crowds at the twice. Told Oldham County more.

Uh . I feel like those, those teenagers. Really dug what we were. I kind of feel like if they were coming out to see us at , uh, twice told in Oldham, they actually wanted to see us. They weren't just showing up the tech world on a Friday night. Like they do. I think it was the people who were already going.

I think this was Oldham County kids who were already going to be at the twice told I just think that our music, our music fit them a little bit more. That makes sense. Fit the tech world grass outside of, outside of the people that we brought. Right. Speaking of the Oldham County twice told I ha there's a recording of us playing live.

And I think what I'm going to do is extract the songs from it and maybe put it on , uh, the band. There is a born yesterday band camp page. And so I'll probably put the songs of that on here and I'll just make them for free for everybody. So if anybody wants to hear what we used to sound like, you can go to the , uh, born yesterday five Oh two.band camp.com.

Wow. Now, is there any way to get that onto the Spotify guys? Uh, It's certainly possible. I'm not sure that I feel comfortable. Like it's just not my best. It's not our best. It's just, you know , um, but for sure for now it was, it was a piece in, in time. Yeah. I'll, I'll work on it. I'll see if I can clean it up.

Good enough to get on Spotify. I have some of the , uh, like the studio recordings on , um, on a. What's it called on a SoundCloud page somewhere , so, hopefully you can post that. I'm going to tweet it right now. Well, after the show, I'll remember to tweet, I'm going to write tweet my notepad and good.

Speaking of the right. I will do that later, which is the original line, the original lineup. When I used to have hair. Uh, this is Ryan here. This is the, the most talented songwriter I know right here in the front. Uh, then that's me in the second spot. And then Ben lovely, who played drums , uh, at the beginning.

And there's Mikey back there in the back. That's me. Yeah. Um, I remember take, go back to that picture where it's the four of us. Cause I want to talk about it real quick. Um, I remember specifically, and I don't remember why, but you told me for the image. Cause we have other pictures from the set somewhere and I don't remember where they are.

I probably haven't told everyone, but go ahead. Yeah. Go ahead. You told everybody to, yeah, you're right. You told everybody to wear like a different unique outfit and you had a plan for all, all of you, including yourself. And then we show up for the photo shoot and I'm the only one that did it. Right. And so everybody else is just wearing like a shirt.

And jeans and looks normal and I'm over here wearing this weird black thing. I remember that outfit and it had like gold dragons on the front of it.That's awesome. It is. I don't even remember where I got it. It, I don't want to say it was silk, but it was kind of like almost a , uh, like a. Like a Japanese style type of outfit.

And so I'm wearing that everybody else is just wearing like shirt and jeans and I'm like, Oh, cool. Yeah, I look great. we go shopping, like for all of us or something. Like, I don't know. It was crazy. I was like , you, you had this whole , like, I was trying to like biscuit, Westmoreland plan, where you had one guy in the band that was just a weirdo and you wanted it to be me no And that was kind of what, what we talked about. And didn't never. It never really went anywhere.

Yeah. I would never do that to you now. And I'm really sorry. Oh, thanks, please. Forgive me. I'd be more open to do it now though. So Wes Borland sounds awesome. Yeah, I haven't thought about that guy in ages. Did it all for the cookie. I haven't thought about him I went and since, until his name just came out of my mouth, to be honest.

So wild. This is a fun picture. We did this at , uh, the studio. Um, this was, who knows when this was, it seems like , uh, Ben was there at some point, right? So we could have all been simply remember being so tired and laying down on the floor and playing, waiting for the rain. You laying down on the floor a few times playing songs, to be honest.

Well, yeah, I was lazy, right? Yeah. Yeah. So we just didn't have like a, what is the word I'm looking for? Like a, a cohesive. Uh, goal, you know, if we just would've said, Hey, let's try to become this or be this, or, you know, or what do you want to do? And like, try to put it all together in a thing. Like, , uh, we might've got to the next level, you know , like, cause that, that last show we did at Jillian's was really good.

Like , uh, I poured my heart out on Island. Nobody were really wanting to make decisions and then you would just make decisions by default and we would just want like, yeah, that sounds fine. Uh, this was a fun show too, but yeah, it was fun. Uh, Ben was at work. Yup. Took a little break from work to play, even wearing your name tag and you've learned, man.

It's awesome. That's awesome. That was fun. That was fun. It was actually a good chunk of people in the audience there. I remember that was, was that the , um, I know we played a couple shows at Kentucky kingdom. Um, one of them was where they did that thing where they were like 200 bands in one day or something like that.

It was that one because I had worked, I had worked all throughout the night. Yeah. Because they had done it a couple of times and this one was like, this was like, this was the one in front of the pool though. This was the one in front of the pool. This is the stage in front of us. The big one though.

Technically the biggest show we ever played. Right? I think so. Just because everybody in hurricane count people there. Yes. There were a lot of people there. Um, as we played me and Ryan played a show here. Where we were on the stage. Were you in the band, Mike? Um, I was not at the band. I was the possibly the only time I saw you guys live before I joined the yeah.

And I was like using the synthesizer and everything, like on the guitar? Yes. You were using the synthesize and you had your, you had the guitar with the , uh, with the assistance hookup on it. Yeah. And I think Ryan had a keyboard. Uh, I think he was playing bass, but maybe he had a keyboard. Yeah. He was playing the bass, but I think he had a keyboard and he played like the intro song and then he would start playing the bass.

Yeah , yeah, yeah , yeah, yeah. It was a while. It was this totally stage. Was that , uh, it was that it was in like Northwest territory. I was the one, it was the, the amphitheater, the one with the, the regular stage or whatever, the Looney tunes, amphitheater, the loonie James amphitheater. Yeah. That was fun about that.

Yeah. Okay. I think that's, that's all I got here. Oops. I just closed the picture. Uh, yeah. So , uh, those are the , uh, pictures. So if you've got to watch this , uh, on the screen, that was us , um, born yesterday, five Oh two.band camp.com to hear some of the old songs there. Tweet that out.

I'm kind of surprised this is going so smooth.

Sometimes me and Ben have some major hiccups are I do. And then Ben has to fill in. Uh, yeah. So anything else rant about hamburgers? I mean, I have thoughts on pizza and I just want to go in and they're right in. Okay. So, so this is based on the last two weeks ago, your podcast where you were talking about what kind of pizza you get, and you said you like to get dominoes and you tell me if I'm in the mood for, for filler pizza.

Yes. Yes. If I'm getting filler pizza, it's going to be dominoes. Just wanted to point out that Domino's is also my favorite filler pizza place. Um, I hate Papa. John's Papa John's is garbage. It's hot. I mean, I know I'm in Louisville and we're supposed to love Papa John's cause it's everywhere, but it's crap.

It was great. 20 years ago, 25 years ago when I was a kid. Now it's just, the cheese is gross and the sauce is gross. And the crust crust has never been up to par. It's just, it used to be, it used to be decent filler pizza though. Like you could eat a Papa John's and be like, this is okay. And now it's just, it's it's so bad.

It's so bad. And. I hope Papa John's is Elizabeth to be like, cancel these guys. But no, I don't like I'd much rather have Papa John's has their own problems right now. They got a red light flashing on it. People are talking by this on a podcast, so let's take care of them. Yeah. They do have their own problems right now.

I worked with a girl who. A few years ago, I'm not going to go into too many details. I worked with a girl who was friends with one of Papa John's as children. And basically every story you've heard about him just being a douche, a hundred percent true. He's just, just a Dick bag. So , um, I was heard that and I'm like, okay, cool , good, good to know.

So in summation, don't eat Papa. John's go get dominoes and said pizza. It's okay. You have to be in a mood for pizza hut. If we're going to have this column, then we're going to have this conversation. I have to, I have to insert the greatest pizza that me and my wife just found recently is this place called Coals it's very fancy.

Oh, yes. The coals. Yeah, the brick, the brick pizza. It's it's it's like fine dining on a pizza. It's amazing. Really? Yeah. I've never heard of this place where there like a, like a blaze kind of deal. No, no , it's, it's literally fine dining on a pizza. So , uh, yeah, so it's like caviar and lobster beats. It's it's it's some good stuff.

It's really great. Um , just, just so we're all clear. This is C O L S right? Yes. Not the department store

Oh, I wrote down Coles, C O L E like a fire burning coal. So yeah, it's it's is a top-notch. Uh, shout out to you guys. Thank you for making such good pizza. Um, I wish they were bigger. They're kind of small, but , uh, they're definitely delicious. Um, Ben mentioned local places. He likes some pillows areas, which I Impellas areas is not my favorite place, but they're pretty good.

Um, my favorite local is Oz on Bardstown road. We were looking for a new pizza place a few weeks ago and I'd had them before and I was like, let's get XOs and we got it. And we were just all like, Oh God, this is so good. So is our go-to non-local place. It's it's a New York style, right? Um, yeah, I mean it's well, no, I wouldn't call it New York style.

It's just, I don't know what to call it. I just call it normal pizza pizza. It's not that much different from a pillow series. Yeah. It's just, you know, not too thick, not too thin, not too big, not too small. Just to size. Yeah, I'll tell you what boom boss is. My they're they're they're, they're climbing up the ladder.

There I'll have to in a while because I always thought they were a little too expensive. Like they're, they're a little pricier than other places and I'm a cheapskate. And , um, it was, it was cool to go there when they have like the tap house. So you gotta to get the good beer to go with the pizza. But as far as like ordering it to go, it's like, they're not.

Not what I want. Eventually the world's going to open up and we can go to a restaurant. I'll probably go to Bombas, but they're not on my, on my list. Right? Not on your carry out to jets. Jets is one of my favorite jets is fantastic. Eight corners is fantastic. Detroit style. Okay. It's not that just doesn't taste bad, but the fact that they charge extra for certain toppings is totally weird to me.

And , uh, Upsets me, but every time I'm like, Oh, that'd be a lot of places do that. Pizza's $15, but yeah, they charge per topping. But, but also if it's like chicken, it's extra in addition to the pro topping, you know what I mean? So it's like double upcharge when I was at sky zoned jets was our pizza provider for the last, like two years.

, uh, so every birthday party. Would come with pizza. So there was just constantly jets pizza coming in and out. And then, you know, you have a party that doesn't show up, but then their pizza shows up and then somebody has got to eat this thing. Jet's pizza, which, you know, the prior two years it had been Papa John's.

Um, so I did eat a, a fair amount of Papa John's. But jets was such an upgrade. Yeah. Oh yeah. Every heat so much better reheat, so much better than, yeah. It's so good. Don't get me wrong. I just wish they would just average there. We only got cheese or pepperoni. Yeah. Why can't they average the cost? So no premium ingredients, little kids aren't getting, you know, artichokes on their pizza or right.

You know what I'm saying? Like the difference between a ser, you know, like even sausage, I think was a premium and grab, I'm not sure, but it just seemed like a lot half of their ingredients are premium. So I was like, you know, a double upcharge, like, why can't they just average it? Do you know what I mean?

Is that that hard?

And I'm going to make your money. I had one more pizza note and that is, I do not like Chicago style pizza at all. It's I mean, I'll eat it. It's cause it's still pizza. I hate the, it it's offensive that you have to use a knife and a fork to me, like a piece of pizza, you should be able to hold and eat.

That's kind of the whole point of pizza. And so when it becomes a sit down weird casserole meal, I don't want to have to deal with it. Um, Now I will, I will say though, I've never actually been to Chicago, so I've never had real Chicago style pizza from one of the famous Chicago places like UNOS or something.

Yeah. Something like that. Is that where we went? Where did we go? Mike? A couple of times the pizza place who knows? I mean, there used to be an UNOS on Fern Creek. I don't know if there are any, where did we go eat pizza? That was like kind of deep dish. Mean, I've eaten so much peace in my life.

I have no idea what you're talking about. Wow. Is that place on Westport road over by Tinseltown? Oh , um, old Chicago, old Chicago. Yeah. It's a little salty greasy, but it's good. I don't remember. But if I've ever had pizza from in there though, cause I would always get, they had these little pepperoni popper bite things and then I would get lasagna.

So. Yeah. I don't know. This is all right. Sorry. You can. Uh, so there's a place called Lou Malnati's right there in Chicago and you can literally have them mail you a pizza, but yeah, it's, it comes frozen and then you just pop it in the oven. Uh, it's pretty rad. I got the sausage and it's literally like, if this is the pie, the.

There's just one giant sausage Patty that's like that big. Right. And so it's just like big sausage Patty. Crust. And then they just put all the stuff on top of it. Uh, pretty rad do read right now. It's also like it's also like 60 bucks to have them send you this pizza. I was going to say where's the other shoe here?

Yeah, there's definitely a another shoe so we can get, we could get it in the mail, like official Chicago style pizza. Yeah , well, that's awesome. I mean, that sounds like a good idea for a future podcast where everybody tastes the luminol, these , uh, sausage hockey puck pizza. Yeah. Why not? All right, Jacob's gone. This is something I always felt Jacob could appreciate is a lot of modern, you know, recording techniques were first done by the Beatles and done by, you know, like the beach boys and stuff like that.

Like, you didn't have digital processing or anything like that. , you know, it was called, you know, tape, you know, they were literally like pulling on the audio tape to create sound effects and stuff like that. And they were, they were slowing down, takes to make it fit the right key because, you know , um, it's , um, there's a strawberry fields.

The first half of the song is in one key and the other half of the song is in another key. And I just speed one up and slow the other down to put them in the same key. Brilliant, right. Nobody was doing that shit at the time. Or maybe everybody was in the Beatles were just the ones everybody remembers, you know , uh, I read Jeff Emmerich's book , uh, called here, there, and everywhere it is , um, it he's, he was basically like the lead engineer for the , uh, revolver.

Pepper misery tour and half of the white album until he quit in the middle of the white album, because that was quite hated. Everybody hated each other. And he was like, this is a toxic environment I'm leaving. Um, but yeah. Great, great book, highly recommend. Uh, Jacob, I recommend to you as well. If you're in a reading mood , uh, read here, there, and everywhere, but Geoff Emerick fixed.

Uh, he was the. Uh, nonfiction here. He was the lead engineer for the Beatles during , uh, like the most productive, productive, most important albums. Uh, and it's a lot of just like him going into some of the weird recording techniques that they used. That's awesome. Yeah. To make that sound interesting. Sounds like I won't remember.

So I'm going to go ahead and save it. I'm going to go ahead and get it. Uh, Geoff Emerick. How do you spell it? Uh, G E O F F British Jeff E M E R I C K. I believe

Yeah. At one point, at one point , uh, John Lennon comes in and he says, I want my voice to sound like , uh, a monk on a mountaintop. This is why we're recording tomorrow. Never knows. And then he just like, went off lunch. You got to get the, uh , the, the , uh, Ricola filter. Right. So they , uh, they had an amp where I think the speaker spun inside.

Yeah. I can't remember what, what are those called? Like they are called rotary cabinets. They had like a nickname to the Lesley cabinets, you know, that's what they, Leslie. That's what I was looking for. Yeah, which you can now simulate with a click of a button. Yeah. Good times for us. Yeah. While you were gone that, you know, the Beatles had a lot of stuff happened now it's literally just like a button you Bush and there, they had to like, you know, physically move equipment around in certain ways to get the sound.

Yeah. It's wild, man. Like, Music technology is weird now, man, it's like AI just hit a button, like it mixes for you kind of, I mean, now people can like record albums on their cell phones. Yeah. That's true. Walking around, hitting that, that little app with the beats going like, Oh, I got the new music now.

Yep. New mixtape.

All right. So Mike, how old is your daughter now? She's eight. She's eight. Okay. So in 10 years he's like, no, let's call it eight years and eight years. She's 16. She's like, dad, I want to learn how to play the bass and be in a band. What are you going to tell her? Absolutely, of course. Okay. But like what, what kind of tips are you going to give her?

Where are you? God, it shouldn't be the last person telling anybody you're going to put her through like a whole school of rock situation. Oh, no, I would definitely not do that. Um, I would tell her Sarah, the Maxwell, see my, I feel like my band experience is not , uh, the same as a lot of other people's bands experiences, because like, you know, , uh, everybody in our band was all for all intents and purposes, pretty chill.

And we weren't super big. And so it's like, we never , like, you know, once you get to a certain level as a band, you start having other people, maybe shady people trying to influence you for their own nefarious means. And lucky for us. We never got to that point. Nope. We were the only nefarious shady people around.

Yeah. So our, our experience was , uh, a lot more laid back, but if she actually learned to join a band and start , um, You know, maybe getting more successful and having other people come around and trying to use you to do stuff. I want her to just, you know, hopefully be smart, use your head and don't just say yes to people.

And this sounds like I'm doing some sort of like antisexual abuse thing, but no, what I mean is just, you know, don't just sign, don't just sign anything. If some guy comes up to you and says, Oh, here's a. You know, here's a contract where you make some money. Why don't you just come sign? I can make you a star.



So in the whole, like being a parent realm, I mean, at this point, She's eight. So she's definitely heard the Beatles, right? Oh yeah. Definitely. Like she's pretty well versed. I mean, a lot of the beetles can be characterized as children, music. Uh, you get like altogether now one, two, three, four, you know? Um, so at what point do you go from all right, this is just music that plays in the house or whatever to, okay.

Now we're going to sit down. And we're going to listen to revolver from beginning to end. I think she's probably at least a few years off of that because , um, she's kind of very , um, think of what words she's kind of flighty and she's not very , um, She's not going to have the attention span. She doesn't really have, even at eight, she doesn't really have the attention span for that kind of thing.

Like if I were to tell her, we're going to sit here, we're going to have the TV turned off and you can't look at your tablet and you can't look at a book and we're just going to listen to this music for 45 minutes. So she would probably say. 30 seconds and I'm bored. Can we go do something? So she's not quite to that point where you can just, I mean, you know, we obviously can just listen to music.

I mean, I don't normally listen to music, just listening to music. I'm usually doing other things, but if I had to, if somebody told me, you know, held a gun in your head, okay, you gotta sit down and listen to this album for 15 minutes. I'd be okay. And I would sit and listen to it and think about it. But yeah, she's definitely.

A few years out from that. And I kind of don't necessarily think it's her. I think it's more of just the, the condition of the world. Um, cause like our parents would complain about us watching too much TV or playing too many video games right now. And now the complaint is, Oh, everybody's on their phones or their tablets or whatever.

And it's just, it's just how it is. And , the cat's out of the bag. There's nothing you can do about it. At this point. We're not going to go back to making our kids stay outside, pushing a hoop with a stick anymore. You know, it's just the weight of the world has , uh, come down upon us.

And now we are, you know, we're looking at our phones all the time and it just is what it is. So then dopamine hits. Yeah. Yeah, exactly. Got to get the dopamine hits, got to, you got to crush all the candies and , um, do all this. The Duke is and all that stuff. So whatever you do on your phones, read all the Reddits.

You've got to upvote all the rest. Just scroll, scroll. Keep scrolling. Yes. And then how much T swizzle are you listening to these days? Keith whistle. Yeah. She, she got you on that Taylor Swift. Oh, teeth with, Oh, I was going to bring Taylor Swift up. Wasn't I , um, whenever it comes on the radio, I hear it. And I have a very specific complaint about Taylor Swift.

Um, just the way, the way, the way you just kind of sank into it. Oh, I got to think about it. Whatever Taylor Swift. Yeah. Um, so I don't really have a problem with Taylor Swift. Um, as a, as a musical artist. , if you think about her as just like another person on the radio, she makes her music.

It's very poppy, it's top 40 stuff. You know, she has hits their number one, whatever, if you think about it like that, Taylor Swift is fine. My biggest problem is there are a lot of people out there that think that she's a complete musical genius and as the second coming of Christ and that her music is the best and her shit doesn't stink.

And that she's just amazing. And I'm just like, she's so. Average. She's so boring and average. I mean, she's talented enough, but it's not like she's the greatest guitarist ever. It's not like she has the greatest singing voice ever. Who does? I don't know. I mean, when you're trying to compare it to a wreath or something, you know, obviously not, but I feel like there are so many people that just live and die by Taylor Swift.

It bothers me. she's not a musical genius. That's my point. She's not a musical genius. She's a marketing genius. I'll tell you that she has some really good people out there that are running her business for her. You know, those are the people that should have been running born yesterday.

Right. So , uh, so that's just my biggest problem with her is that she, if she were just fine and nobody, you know, just. Everybody just listened to her like a normal band. That'd be fine, but they're just people that are crazy for her. And I just don't get it, but I'm sure there are a lot of other bands out there like that Taylor Swift is that she's a marketing genius.

Yeah. That's I guess that's kind of my problem. Yeah. She's a marketing genius. She's a personality, I think is what happened. Yeah. I bet that's the thing. Anytime I've ever seen her in an interview, she's just so dull and like vanilla, like in her music is just dull and vanilla and it's like, Oh, she was writing guitar songs when she was 12 years old.

And I'm like , well, she doesn't. Sound like she's actually matured any hurt, as long as all the sound kind of the same, like all the new ones. I hear sound kind of the same average, this of the ones I heard when she started out. So it's like, I don't know. And I'm going to get all kinds of shit. People want to be like, I'm not saying I hate Taylor West people listening to our podcasts.

So all, all the people that listen to this podcast now are going to be tweeting at me being like you hate Taylor Swift. I'm going to come here and ask this your ass. I'm like, yeah. , you know, this is the thing that like, I, you know, I don't know if you know how to hold another brand, but get songs done that where I'm exploring these, you know, music sick is all about four chords and it has been forever and

I think the majority of the population just doesn't understand that , like, it does not take that much to make a song, you know? No, it does it doesn't. And, but you do have certain bands whose, you know, whether it's marketing. Cause I know in marketing applied , uh, plays with a lot of different artists, you know, they look for their, their people and there's genre and they have their own, you know, images like, like say Billie Eilish, for example, like she has an image and she's selling that image and you know, her music is fine and you know, Taylor Swift music is fine, but it's like they have this certain particular image.

And sometimes I. Have a problem with it. And sometimes I don't and it has, this was, I don't, I guess I don't really have a problem with Taylor Swift. I just wanted to bitch about her because people talk about her so much and I'm tired of it. You have a problem with the machinations around. Yeah. That's kind of it.

And I mean, it's more of a Taylor Swift, myth. The Taylor with myth. Yes. Like the idea that she, you know, is doing anything special. Is kind of the myth. The myth is that anybody could probably write songs with her quality play music and her quality, but they don't have the marketing engine propping them up to become.

And so this is not more, this is less of a Taylor Swift problem and more of a pop music in general. Kind of thing. Like, you know, it's gotten a lot better recently because with the way music is distributed on the internet, now you have , um, artists that can go out. They don't need a label anymore. They can just go off and do their own thing.

And still somehow find their own following and find their audience. But you know, for this is something everybody knows, you know, for decades or music history, it didn't work like that. You had to get some guy to like you and play you on the radio. Otherwise nobody would have any idea who you were. And luckily we're kind of pulling away from that, but you still have that kind of art cake bones of the music industry doing their Taylor Swift's or doing their.

I don't know any marketing, marketing, you know, it's just a marketing product. I dunno. I'm just rambling. in his house for months, you know, anybody can, anybody can make music, right. Ben like, you know, and it's , uh, what makes the, I think the music different is like the vibe, the lyrics, . And then it would be the branding, you know?

And so that's really like, that's, it's not that complicated, you know, what do you think about this? Ben? Me, me. Oh man. Uh

it's the world is such a different place now. Like nobody's going to get on MTV, play their video. And have the world recognize them as on it, you know, like who are even the gatekeepers anymore. So, you know, gosh, like, you know, yeah. It's almost like somebody, somebody else.

Famous in that arena has to basically like tweet about you and say, I'm listening to this and it's really good. That's the one yeah. The age of influencers. Yeah. Right. Yeah. Um, right. So it's just so fundamentally different and , uh, You can really kind of like, you don't need wide spread appeal anymore, except for, you know, someone like a Taylor Swift or, you know, you've got people who are aiming for that, that gigantic widespread appeal, but you can get very, very specific of like, all right, the audience that I'm targeting are people who like this, and there's enough of them to support.

Me and I don't have to appeal to this mass broad audience. I can just appeal to people who like, you know, mass metal. Right, right. Which is cool. Math metal, you know? Yeah. Like metal, that's all just like, you know, super mathy tool or something. Okay, cool. Yeah. Right. Exactly. Yeah. Yeah. Uh, I always think of rush when I think of , which is almost the reason we started this podcast.

Right. Because like, we're kind of aware of that, but we don't really know. Does that make sense? Is that why we started this? Why did we start the, Oh gosh, I don't know. I really thought it was still like, you know, what's out, it's part of it was to help get our music out there, you know? Oh, right. Yeah, yeah.

Yeah. We thought it would be a fun, fun way to put something out. Why you talking about pizza and Marvel shows? That's right. Yeah, but you know, there's a little bit of music diversifying. Yeah. Talk about what we want to talk about. So our podcast, not yours, huh? Oh, I'm sorry. I'm making a joke.

People might get that. What does it find? There's these , uh, two drag Queens that do these YouTube videos called Trixie, Trixie, Mattel, and Katya. And they start every show like that. Like, you know, this is our show where we talk about anything we want because it's our podcast and not yours. Okay. Then they, yeah, they go into it.

Okay. Nice, good times. All right. If you had to put a bow on the born yesterday experience and what that was for you.

Because that was what, probably what like 2001 to 2005 for you? Yeah, that was probably about it. Yeah. I pretty sure I was 21. I was 21 in 2001 and I think I was 21 when I joined. So , so, you know, that's the equivalent of four years of college or four years of high school, which are, you know, important years for everybody.

So , uh, if you had a college yeah. If you had to put a bow on that experience for you. What, uh , what, what would that be? Um, I mean, would I do it again? Yeah, absolutely. I would do it again. Would I do things different at the time? Probably a little bit. You know, like we said earlier, if we'd had this conversation before we started the band, the band might've actually been a little more successful than it was, but you know, it was a learning process.

I mean, you know, it was fun to me, you know, we talked about everybody was in the band, kind of for a different reason. I just liked hanging out and. Playing music with people that were cool. I say friends, but you know, I didn't really know you until the band. I didn't, I mean, I guess I knew black men before, but I didn't, and I knew Ryan before, but I didn't know, you know, been lovely before.

And so it was like, you know, meeting new people, having fun, just, you know, if you can have fun and somehow also become successful, then I feel like you , you, you one life at that point now I'm not saying that we necessarily one life, but we had a good time, you know, doing what we did. I don't know if I have a really big takeaway from it other than , uh, you know, that's just, you know, some people, I feel like you see bands, you know, it was a bit bit about Taylor Swift earlier, but , uh, you know, they try to make music from a purely commercial standpoint.

Like, you know, I happen to be good at music, so I'm going to try to make music so I can make money and become successful. And that was never. You know, that would have been like a tertiary reason for me. Like if we have want to be good and become successful, that had been cool, but that wasn't the primary reason for it doing it.

Like I said, it's just, it's fun to hang out and make music and have people watching you and like you, and that was kind of all I, that was like the big thing I got out of it. It was fun to stand up on stage for. An hour and you know, maybe people and that's cool. Yay. And they did it like, you know , we, we had fans that we didn't realize we had an annual, maybe this podcast as a way we'll show up at people are searching for us, you know?

Um, because we were played on, on the local radio show, you know, a few times and yeah. Yeah. I mean, people voted for us every, every week. Apparently I don't even know how that worked, but we'd get played a lot. Yeah. Um, mud, we were number one, several weeks in a row, you know? . The DJ's. Mud. He let us know that.

And he was a banter. Mud was a fan. I remember that. So, so Jacob, I feel like your identity was wrapped up into born yesterday, more so than mine was certainly I don't want to speak for Mike.

Why don't you do yours first and then I'll then I'll wrap it up. So, yeah, I mean, like on the whole, I had a lot of fun. Uh, I got to , uh, you know, learn some songs and get up on stage and jump around like a fool. And , uh, we had a good time and sometimes there was a bunch of people in the audience and they really dug it.

And sometimes there weren't that many people in the audience and it was kind of like, whatever. Um, but I had a, I had a good time doing it and , um, , you know, it's , uh, I mean, it's really the only, the only band I've ever been in and I had a blessed , um, so yeah , uh, I think finally on that time and , um, Yeah.

But, but I also know that , like, I didn't, I didn't put into it as much as the two of you did and one, I apologize cause that's not fair. And to , um, uh , um, yeah , like, you know , as, as with any, you know, I guess 20 year old, you know, you're getting pulled in a lot of directions and I was trying to do, you know, A whole bunch of things all at the same time and it, you know, varying degrees of success.

So , um, yeah, I had a good time. I appreciate that time. And , uh, yeah, that's all I got. Yeah, no, I just , um, I had decided I really wanted to do music. Uh, I think it's like , uh, just a. Uh, like seriously, you know, after, after, you know, we both went to the, me and Ben went to a performing arts high school. So we were, we were S we were showing people that it actually like made a career out of theater and musicals and those kinds of things.

And , um, like music has always been new and dear to my heart, obviously. And I just, I wanted to make music. For a living. And I kind of wanted to do it a little bit out of spite because the music that was being taught to me was like a certain way, a certain genre, you know, and I kind of just wanted to just do it.

Um, and I don't know why I thought I could start a band. Um, honestly looking back, like there's no reason, like I wasn't that good, you know , uh, I wasn't good a singer wasn't that good a songwriter. I was none of those things, but I just wanted to. To express myself, you know? And , um, yeah, I was definitely more serious about it , uh, because of that , like, I just want him to do it and I wanted to do it like for a living.

I thought it was possible. Um, I was serious about writing songs. I had written songs when I was in school for , um, audio production. So I was writing songs out there and I just, I was like, man, it would be awesome if I could play these, you know, and , um, That's really where it started.

We went over this already. So after seeing Ryan, like that was really like, Oh man, this guy can really write songs. You know, like if we could get in a band, you know, we would be the shit, you know, so that's where it all started. And sort of, you know, it went down that path of what we talked about earlier and , um, No, I wish I would have had more of a cohesive vision, honestly.

Like even though I was serious about it, like I wish I would have had just a little bit more of a, of a vision and a little more like financial, common sense to make sure that we were making money because we could have got more money. Um, and I just, I was just so bad at it, you know? Um, at the time, you know, we were all young and , uh, there was nobody to.

Lead us like, it's, like you said, , we needed somebody to be like, here's the thing you need to do. You're next, you know? And , uh, we didn't have that. So we were all just sort of blind by the seat of our pants and , uh, yeah, that's all I got. Like now it's like , um, now it's more like, I want to make music that I can show to my kids if I ever have any, you know, like that's where I'm at now.

And , uh, to sum it up, like thank you for being in the band with me, because like there's no reason really like Mike, why you should have been in the band. Like I was probably too mean to you. Like there's no reason to say , uh, Ryan, I don't know why he joined the band.

He was way too talented. Uh, Ben you've got the most stage presence in the most like. Uh, like fun vibe, like you were just too cool. Honestly, you were too cool to be in the band. So like you guys really, even though we weren't like a cohesive unit, like you guys were the band and I just appreciate that. And it was a great time.

That was really like the funnest time. Uh, some of the best moments were playing on, on those stages. So that's all I got.

Awesome.

Jacob just said something so heartfelt. Now we don't know what to say to him. I know, right? That was you asked,

see, I got sear. This is, this was the problem. I always serious, you know, in the band and you guys. They weren't as serious, you know, that was the problem. Yeah. We had a naked drummer. We did have him dead. That was weird. He was in a punk band. No, why he wanted to do that and I don't even want to ask. Okay.

Let's be honest. Jason. Jason was buff. Okay. Yeah. You know, so he was buffed. So like, you know, if you got it, drummers, sweat, Yeah, it's hot. I mean, you think about onstage how we were hot and he's playing. Yeah , yeah, yeah. Uh, yeah. And yeah. Shout out, shout out to Jason too, because , uh, I don't, I don't, we couldn't have done it without him either. Like, you know , definitely, definitely.

Mike, you got anything to plug? That would be great. Um, I let's see, I'm not currently working on any projects. I'm not writing anything. I don't have a blog. I'm not on any other podcasts and I'm not creating anything. So no one checked my list. No, I don't have anything to plug, but if I do have something to plug, I'll definitely come back on and plug it.

Shout out to fatherhood. Yeah. Doing that. Um, uh, I do the dishes a lot and I do cook meals. So , um, there's, what's your go-to, what's your, what's your like , Oh, Oh, you're making this today. Mike's lasagna is the bomb. I've had that homemade, you know, it's funny, you mentioned that my Sonja is really good and I made it , um, Two nights ago, and I still have a little bit in the fridge.

I'm probably gonna eat some of that here. Um, it's nothing special. It's just lasagna, but I'm, I'm pretty good at it. It's pretty damn good at it. Um, I play a game called Eve online.

A lot of people do and , um, I don't really have much to say about it. Maybe at some point I would. Talk about in the future, but , um, yeah, I don't really have anything to say about it. It's a spaceship game. It's an MMO with spaceships. Um, the interesting thing about it as a game is , um, the majority of the content is player created as opposed to like, you know, world of Warcraft, you go and you fight , uh, A raid monster and everybody's fighting the same raid monster, and there's a story.

And all that here, you have like giant player controlled factions that are fighting Wars with each other. So all of the, the meta gaming has to do with actual people as opposed to worried about how to kill a boss. So that's what kind of, what makes it interesting. Um, Yeah, there's a currently a major war going on right now between two of the largest factions ever assemble in the game.

One of them are the , uh, Goonswarm and then the other group is called Pappy, which is a coalition of several different alliances, including my Alliance, which is called Testa Alliance. Please ignore. And , uh, we're fighting these giant spaceship battles. If you Google it, you'll see. All the news stories about it.

I could provide links later, just email. I love how you were like, look guys, I don't want to get into it. And then like, Three solid minutes of just condensed information. That was goodness. That was right. It's like literally the details. There's a lot more details on it. It's like, you know, I didn't want to get into it, but I wanted to give a broad overview.

So yeah, it's very tiny. Have you watched the , uh, have you watched the mythic quest TV show? Mythic quest. No, I have a nice, it is , uh, it's on the Apple TV. I won't see it. It's what's a it's Rob McElhaney from, it's always sunny. Oh yes. Uh, you write that down so I don't forget it. I saw , um, pre I saw like a trailer for it or something and I was like, Oh my God, that looks great.

Yeah, it is well-worth well worth your time. we don't watch a lot of current TV. We've been bingeing old TV shows. We've been watching the Mary Tyler Moore show. Whew. Which I seem to remember being a lot better when I was a kid. Um, it's very dated because it takes place in the, you know, the early seventies and just certain , um, The way women are portrayed and the way , um, you know, interactions between people are and the way the jobs are and stuff like that, it seems very antiquated.

So. Wild. Yeah. Yeah. I will tell you though, the most recent thing I've watched and if you guys haven't seen it yet, it's the Queen's Gambit. Netflix. I love it. It's really good. Can't get Ben to watch it. For some reason you haven't seen it. I've heard enough. You can't get Ben to watch it. It's on the list.

It's on the list. We just haven't gotten to the list. 11, you can watch true detective season three, skip that. I'm a little behind. Yeah. I understand. I still haven't watched breaking bad season four, so I never saw the breaking bad. Uh, I always get to a point on it where at, and I guess I'm going to go into a little bit of spoilers.

There was a part in it where wife finds out that his wife is cheating on him for the very first time scandal. I know. Right. And at that point in the show, it's so. Like that show is just, I like to watch TV to relax, but when you watch a show like breaking bad and you can't relax, cause everything is crazy and everyone's on the edge of their seat.

And you're just like, and so I get to a point where I'd been watching that show and I'm just like, I can't, I can't handle this anymore. I'm just gonna watch the office again for like the 50th time. So. That's kind of what happened to me with breaking bad and like, there's a lot of shows that are out there that are a lot more intense than a lot more realistic.

And I just I'm like, that's not why you want to watch cheers friends or something. You'd go back and rewatch. Cheers. I, yeah. That's that's on the list. Um, yeah. Yeah. Cheers. Cheers. Cheers. Binge on it. We're it's on Netflix. I believe. I think it is. Yeah, it's on somewhere because that's, we don't even before the, the, a lockdown, we weren't going out and doing a lot of things.

I mean, we, you know, we're older and we have a kid and , um, Our entertainment budget instead of spending money to go out to clubs and going out to bars and stuff like that, we would just stay at home and, you know, so I pay for Netflix, Hulu and Amazon prime. And, you know, that's what we do for entertainment.

We sit and watch TV. So I think a lot of people do that maybe even like closer to our age and younger or older or whatever. So. Just give me a shuttle and I'll at least try to pretend I'm going to watch it. You we're watching Mary Tyler Moore right now, but we don't really have anything queued up after that to watch.

So any suggestions is, you know, people tell me to watch things and I keep writing them on my list and eventually I'll get to them, I guess. So, yeah. Yeah. We're, we're doing the wand division. We got to lose on the fridge. Yeah. Oh, yeah. One division I heard was good. That's great. We're not, not big comic book people.

Like I used to work at a comic book shop when I was a kid and now I just, I don't care anymore. I don't care about the Marvel universe. I just there's too much out there now. Especially there's too much out there. The last Marvel movie I've seen has probably been iron man. Two ways to catch up. Wow. Yeah.

You're 28 movies behind. Yes exactly. Cause I remember , I put on the Avengers and I hadn't watched any, like I said, I've seen iron man, one iron man too. And that might be it. I don't even think I've seen the first captain America or anything. Right. And I turned on the Avengers and I got about 45 minutes into that movie and I was just like, I'm so lost.

I don't know who any of these people are. I don't know what any of them are doing. I don't know what the goal is. What am I doing here? It's like, people are like, they're fighting each other and I'm like, why are they fighting? I have no idea. So I just turned it off. And I think that was probably the last time I watched anything Marvel.

Yeah. It's I think it's worth it. Uh, you know, they're good, highly produced movies, you know, like. You know, they're all entertained. No, I'm sure they're all great. And I, one of these days I might get around to watching them, but I, I just had , yeah, yeah. The mood. You're not in the mood, not in the mood.

You're not in the mood. Yeah. Like I, I just been like, yeah, what were we saying? Uh, just to go back to the office , uh, Cause you, you mentioned that as one of your tos, the Robert California years. Yay or nay. Yay. Yay. Super Robert California is one of the funniest things they've ever had on that show. He's brilliant.

His presence. He, he lights up the screen and James Spader played that character perfectly so good. And he's just, he's just, he's literally insane. And when you watch the Robert California years, you see him just going crazier and crazier as the show goes on. Cause like, you know, he starts off and he's the new boss and he's a little.

Weird and intense, and nobody really knows anything about them, but the more you learn about at least competent. Yes, exactly. But the more you learn about the more you're just like, Oh my God, this guy is just a whack job. There's a whack job with like all the confidence in the world. And he just does things.

They got James Peter, and it's the boss. Yes. Yeah. Wow. After they had this rotating, they , um, the first one was, will Farrell. He was the boss for a little bit. And then , um, that didn't work out very well, so they just kept having other people be the boss and then they ended up settling on Andy being the boss for, I think until the, almost the end of the show, right?

Yeah. . Um, they ended the show with Dwight. I'm not going to say that. I think the office was better after Michael Scott left, but it's not as bad as people it's not as. Yeah, I agree. You got to see the other characters have a little bit more because it did the episode. Didn't have to revolve around Michael anymore.

So you could have other people to do weird, funny things without having to, okay. You always had to have this Michael a block going on. So yeah. I can talk about the office all day. So I have to have another podcast. Yeah, you could do a whole office podcast. There's uh, so many seasons of that show. How many, a nights do you think it was something like that?

And Michael's was the last one was seven or was it six? I don't remember now. Yeah. I think I may have watched the first five or something with you or, you know, or something like that. And I think that might be right. Yeah. The first season was weird because it was just a, basically a one for one with the British one.

They're worth a watch. And we don't watch them that often when we rewatch, in fact, a lot of the rewatch that we've done, we just started season two because everything's so different.

Um, what's between season one and the rest of the show, like the characters hadn't been really been fleshed out, like it was being, like I said before, it's being based on another show. And so it's a little bit more of that show than its own thing, but once it gets into its own, it really takes off and it becomes a definitely a good show.

Okay. So we wrapped up the born yesterday. We got the office. , we got another w we got it. We got big pizza too. We got pizza. Takes

Well thank you Mike, for being a guest. This has been fun. It's been fun. Thanks for having me. I'll come back my time. I don't have to talk about born yesterday. Obviously. I'll talk about whatever you want. Just tell me ahead of time. So I at least can know what I'm going to say.

So, all right. Cool. Yeah. Um, and uh, I think that's going to be, is that it? That's the end. Yeah, that sounds great. I'll play a boring, like a sign off thing you guys say. He says by, at the end, we can do a, we can play. Maybe we can play like a born yesterday song on the outro here. That's a good idea. Just for the record , uh, make sure you follow fake coleslaw on Twitter.

He posts once a year. And uh, thank you guys. I appreciate you, Mike. I appreciate you, Ben. Thanks for being here. Mike. Thank you, Jacob. Jacob, it's been a pleasure. Yeah, it's been fun. And talking about the band again and now it's been , uh, it's been awhile, so yeah. Body. I didn't do any sharing comments. That's fine. People know how to share, share stuff like subscribe, smash that like button box master, like button. All right. Thank you.

 
Is This Entertainment?
Is This Entertainment?
BORN YESTERDAY: Our old local band that went from the basement to the attic 🎸 | ITE Ep 15 w/Mike
/

Is This Entertainment


Questionable entertainment about questionable entertainment brought to you by Ben Owens and Jacob Miller.

{"email":"Email address invalid","url":"Website address invalid","required":"Required field missing"}

The Eternals Broke the MCU? | Is this the end of Is This Entertainment?

We finally watched The Eternals. Did it break the MCU? Does it

 More...

Peter Parkers…Also, Ned is a Wizard Now?

Do you need a really good lawyer? Why is Dr. Strange acting

 More...

THE MATRIX RESURRECTIONS IS…

Once again we agree to disagree about a film. In this episode

 More...

Hawkeye Finale Review | ITE Podcast Ep52

We finished Hawkeye and do we finally agree on a show?--- Stuff

 More...

We watched the first 3 episodes of Hawkeye. Have we changed our minds?

We watched things and Hawkeye ep 1-3 Is This Entertainment? We watched

 More...

Dune Part 2, Venom Part 1 Review | ITE EP50

Clarification on Dune plus a full Venom 2 Review (Spoilers)Intro Song: https://ite.page.link/PTMYFeatured JW

 More...

The talk you should have before starting a band 15 years too late.

We take a look back on our old band from the mid 2000s with our former bass player, Mike, to reminisce about "the glory" days. What it's like to be in a band in Louisville during the MySpace era. 

Listen to Born Yesterday

https://ite.page.link/bYdemo

https://ite.page.link/bysoundcloud

Live Show [Youtube]

Transcript

Okay. Three, two, one, I guess. Welcome. Well, Well, V is. This entertainment podcast. We have a special guest today. Big day, big day. This is a big news. It's the first time we've all three been in the same room.

And, uh , well, I can't say that's what 2000 and we're not in the same room. Yeah. So , uh, we have today a special guest, our former bass player, Michael Kolesar, Sr Mike Kolesar, and , uh, whatever. Welcome back. Okay. Hello, welcome. Thank you for having me. I'm doing great. Thanks for being here. Oh, you know, I had , uh, I had to clear my schedule, like weeks in advance to make sure I was here, but here I am.

Cause you know, we all have so much stuff going on right now in the world. Hey, it takes a while I edit this thing. Yeah, it probably does, but yeah, you make an excellent point. So , um, yes , uh, we all used to be in a band together what, 15, 20 years ago, 40 something like that. Yep. Yeah , yeah, yeah. 15. What is a 15?

W w when did it go? Uh, yeah, 2005 was, was the Gillian show. And I feel like that Mark, that was the, yeah, that was the greatest show. Was that our last shot? Yeah. I I think so. Yeah. We had another one scheduled, but then somebody decided to bail for the show. Oh yeah. Yeah. That's right. It's not talking about that.

Let's be honest. I was one foot out the door already. Oh yeah. I didn't know that you were only one foot in the door in the first place. That's true. Ah, look, I wasn't the best committed band mate. All right. I'll I'll say it. I'll say it, showed up, but you showed up, showed up in your little guitar and song a dance and you played, you performed the hell out of it.

Yeah. Look, I acted a fool and we had a good time. That was fun. Yeah. Yeah. Jacob was the serious one. All the restaurants were like, Hey, we're in a fun band. And Jacob's like, I'm making this my life. Yeah. I was too serious. Is my art. Uh, you guys, are you guys familiar with the shins? Yeah, no.

Uh, I saw them play at headliners. Probably like 2004, something like that. And it, it was like , uh, their main dude. Um, ah, gosh, I forgot his name, but uh, it's like James something. I think he was like intensely serious and there was like three, three minute pause, pause in between every song for him to like do something.

Change the tuning grab a different guitar or something like that in between every single song, the bass player and the other guitar player. And the drummer would just like joke around on the microphone. And I was like, this is a really weird dynamic because this guy over here is very much like , uh, everyone pay attention to my very important words.

And everybody else was like, We can't believe we're getting paid and we're going to drink later. After that album a tour, they put out one more album and then he fired everyone from the band and hired a whole new band and kept the name and just kept going. And I think that's funny. That was kind of an exact replica of what we did.

Cause it would be Jacob never wanted to like do any, you know, crowd banter in between songs or whatever. And always be me saying stupid shit or using stupid shit or whatever. And Jacob would just be all serious. Like I was in a different Bay. We were all in a different band, I think is what, yeah, we, all four of us were in a different band to get a hundred percent, a hundred percent.

Yeah. So , uh, Mike , um, once what I don't know the machinations of, of the band early on. So , um, just real quick before, before we jump into like the BYU specifically, what ma what made you want to be in a band? Okay, well , um, That's a really stupid question for me because it's, I , uh, started playing music because I was going to be in a band and not the other way around.

Um, So what happened was, is at the time , um, so I, I was thinking of born yesterday in three parts. There's part, a part B part C part a is all Jacob. Jacob was doing his own thing called born yesterday for awhile. If I'm not mistaken , right, Jacob,

excuse me. I was playing on my own with , uh, like just acoustic at the open mic at twice told , um, and recording music. You know, I had just gotten out of a recording school and came back home to Louisville. And , uh, that's where I met up with Ryan who is a great songwriter and , uh, He was playing at the open mic too.

And that was actually at the beginning was me asking Ryan. So there wasn't. Okay. So I guess there's only okay. We'll call it that part a then. So the fit, my scheme , um, So I was in part B part B is when a born yesterday actually became a full band instead of just Ryan and Jacob. And , um, I, at the time I had a guitar, I didn't play the bass at all.

And Ryan said, Hey, I'm in a band and I play the bass, but we really want a basis. Do you know how to play the bass? And I'm like, I don't, but I know how to play the guitars. I'm sure I could figure it out. It's the same thing with less strings, right? And so I went and got myself a bass and started playing the bass.

And then literally the only time I've ever played the bass was when I was in born yesterday. So, and I wasn't very good at it. Yeah. Like I didn't , like, I couldn't sit up if you had me like go on on the stage and like jam with other musicians. I couldn't do it because it was like, I only know how to play born yesterday, as long as, I don't know, I think we were all like Stripe seven nation army is the only real musician.

It's Ben who could actually probably jam with somebody else. Like we're not those kinds of musicians. Yeah. Um, so wait , so, so , you knew Ryan before the band. I went to high buddies, Ryan. Ah, gotcha , gotcha, gotcha. Gotcha. Okay. And in high school he didn't even play the guitar for a long time.

He only played the piano and he , uh, he's one of those guys that never actually had any formal training. You just put them in front of an instrument and like two seconds later, he's just playing all kinds of crazy shit. Like he's one of those natural musician types. Yep. But he also was. Like , he, he didn't really think of himself as a musician for a while.

He thought of himself as a writer. So he wrote poetry. And when I say poetry, like thousands of poems , like, and he would just turn those into music. Like if he, he should have just, instead of becoming like a, like a musician front man type of person, if he probably probably could have. Work down the career of being a songwriter for like other bands and stuff, because he just had this massive catalog of music that he had written and you could go through, he'd like have binders like this thick and you could flip through it and be like, Hey, what's this song.

And he would instantly remember, Oh, that song. And he would just start playing it. Cause like he knew it, like he didn't have the music written down or anything. He just knew every song by what it was. Yeah. He was ridiculous in the hundreds of songs. Yeah. He could, he could probably do something like even now, Ryan, if you're listening for some reason , like, you know, Probably do something in Nashville or something, you know?

There's Oh, there's careers for songwriters like that. Do you got a lot of talent? So, yeah, that's how I got in the band. It was just literally a, Hey, we need someone to play the bass. You want to play the bass? And I'm like, yeah. Okay. I'll play the bass. And we had a drummer too, that came in , uh, Ben. Lovely.

Yeah, but I think we met him. Did we meet him there too? As well at twice to old, the old copy. Copy shop. I think he joined the band not less than a month before I joined the van, but how do we find Ben? I think was that how we found I met him. I don't, I don't remember. Cause he was already there. I think he was a guy that just came into twice total.

I wish I could remember. I think that's what it was though. I think he played guitar at twice sold and saying, yeah, I think so. And then you found out he was a drummer and he's like, Hey, we need a drummer. And he's like, okay, I'll play the drums. Yeah. He was fun. He was, he was cause he was in another band where he played the guitar, something crazy, like way better than born yesterday.

He was, he was like a real guitar player. Yeah. Um, Yeah. We had, so we had a combination of songs from Brian, like a select few picks of Ryan songs that like worked with the band dynamic. , uh, and then songs that I had written as well. It was kind of how I think it started.

And then , uh, later Ryan decided he couldn't do it anymore. I actually banquet first. Right? The other Ben , well, Ben went to grad school and so he, I think he ended up going to UK. And so he's like , well, I'm leaving. And so I'm going to Lexington. So like , well, he can't do that. How I ended up playing drums that one time , um, I think.

No, because that was really kind of early in our career. I think it was just that something was wrong. And Ben had a thing where he was going to be out of town for a week, but we had already booked the show. So it was like, we didn't want to cancel the show, but we, you get a drummer

and Jacob's like, I got this friend, Ben, he plays the drums do you play the drums? I can fake it enough to that was that , um, Oh, that place on fourth and Oak the Rudyard Kipling. Yeah. Yes. It's still there. Yeah. Is it still there by? No, no, it's not. I mean, the building's still there, but it's not the rut anymore.

I think some, I think some like development, people bought it and we're going to do some stuff, but , um, I believe it's, I believe it, but that place had a weird vibe about it. You remember? I always, I always felt weird. Literally the , the, the , the, the corner that has the highest crime is fourth and Oak. Okay.

So some negative energy dynamics. Yeah. Yeah. Okay. Yeah. It's it's not, I wouldn't call that a super fun, safe neighborhood to be in. I always just felt really strange. Yeah. Like I don't even really have words for it, but. I don't know. How does the building itself was pretty cool. I like, cause they had like a little restaurant part and like a bar and then they had the room with the, you know, the music set up and then they have like another room over here.

Yeah. It was a nice venue. It was just in a bad location. It was close. Like just like the dynamics of the restaurant bar vibe with whatever was happening in the performance. The business never knew exactly what it wanted to be, but I feel like that's also because it changed ownership like a handful of times.

That makes sense. That's probably true. Cause I feel like I remember, I think a lot of people would just go there to eat because it was mainly a restaurant and it's like, why are people playing music over there? It's like, yeah, it's loud. I don't like this. Whatever, whatever food they started.

I don't remember hummus. They had hugs drinks though. I remember their drinks being been great. I mean, I've never met a bar with bad drinks, to be honest. So yeah. Just saying I was just, I remember flying there. Yeah. So , so, so Ben left and then pretty soon thereafter is when I think, no, we had a replacement, we got black men to play drums.

Um, and then it was, it was black men and Ryan in the drum or in the band at the same time? Yeah, not for very long though. No, no. And I don't know if that had anything to do with why Ryan left or if it was just me like being a control freak or, or what, so. I think it was mostly you being in control. That makes sense.

Yeah. I always felt bad about it. Like, I felt really guilty about it later. Like , well, I mean, I don't feel like Ryan really was super excited about the kind of music we were trying to play. He wanted to be more like the singer songwriter and he didn't want to play. Whatever kind of rock music, I guess I always call it alternative rock, but, you know, I feel like he wasn't as into the style of music we were trying to make and that's part of the reason why he left.

, I don't know. I felt bad because I didn't, I didn't support his music. Uh, you know, as much as I should have, you know, cause he's, he's super talented and I really should have gave him more props for what he was doing and his contributions. So Ryan could there, I appreciate you, man.

That's all I'm saying. It sounds rocked. Yeah. Yeah. Great. You know, even if that wasn't his main jam , uh, yeah. Like his stuff was, yeah. I, I enjoy playing Ryan songs more than the mine.

So, so that, that , uh, you know, I remember from my perspective, I had. Gone off to college in Texas. And when I came back, Jacob was. Telling me like, Oh, you gotta, you gotta sit in with us. Like, we're doing some stuff. Um, maybe we could roll with two guitar players , um, plus Jacob playing guitar as well, you know?

Yeah. I asked you , before Ryan even quit, I asked you right. Right. Right. And, and like , uh, and I think we had even talked about it for a minute when I like played the drums that one time of like, okay, maybe this one, it would be like the way to like springboard into something , uh, where I joined up and then, you know , uh, but I didn't want to step on Ryan's toes either.

Cause you know , like, you know, he's good dude. Um, so , uh, and then plus I was going to U of L and doing all kinds of stuff there. So, you know, I wasn't in a place where I felt like I could commit to anything. And then , uh, and then like slowly that kind of whittled away. And, you know, we found a way to make it happen.

Um, But by then Ryan was gone. So, , what's weird. Uh, I remember having like a rehearsal with some like random other drummer. Oh yes. And he was only there for like a day or two. I think I remember that. I feel like, Oh, we tried. And that guy was, and another band that played. Cause I think we were.

Where we, Jacob, and I think we're working at tech world at the time. Yeah. And this guy was in one of those bands and Ben lovely. I think he had said he was leaving because he, he was gonna, he was gonna leave like the town permanently, but in the, between him leaving town and him leaving the band, he was going to still play guitar for his other band for a couple of months.

And so he was leaving to go do that and we needed a drummer. Cause it was another one of those situations where we were, we have a show booked and we don't have a drummer. So we got to get somebody to come in. And the thing is, our songs are not ridiculously complicated play. It's not like rush or tool or anything like that where we're crazy time signatures.

Yeah, exactly. Okay. All our songs are in like seven 16, so it's going to be like, no, that's not like that. Our songs are all just got to beat and you can. I guess yeah, yeah. To tap your feet and stuff like, Hey, there's a picture. That's the tech world. Oh, Hey, that is tech world, right? Yeah. Is that us playing or is that just some random we're in a band, but uh, this venue was like the coolest venue , like.

It had the shortest ceiling ever though , like, you can't really tell from this picture, but if you're standing on the stage at tech world, you can put your hand Palm, like flat up against the ceiling like this. So from the stage, yeah, it was from the stage. It was , uh, all ages venue. It was an all, yeah, they had beer.

They had beer. Right. But they had certain nights where it wasn't all ages, but they did a lot of all ages shows a lot more than any other venue. I remember in Louisville. Yeah. It was so fun working there. And that's like, where I was introduced to like a lot of, you know, heavier music. That's where, where we've, where I found sub method, which is like still one of my favorite things to listen to.

Oh yeah. That's right. You remember? A lot of national shows come through there. Like a lot of it's, like you said, it's like harder metal type stuff. So I didn't know. That's why I always felt a little out of place there. Yeah. They had nights where I remember they would have like their punk nights and then they would have their metal nights and then they would have their just general rock nights.

They had a lot of just regular metal though. Like, and I remember, you know, I'm not going to disparage anybody's music, but we had a lot of shows Jacob, cause Jacob would do the sound and I would do the, I would run the light board and it would just be for bands where every song was.

on that. And I'll say this is the same. Yeah. Yeah. It was just like a barrage of noise. Cause they had a really decent sound system and it was loud. Yeah. Um, But they would come in and just be like, okay, we're called a death of death or whatever. And then it'd just be like, . And I would just sit there on the light board and just like hit presets with my head earplugs and just kinda like, you know, it's sad.

It's like, some of that music is like, so technical. So like you would never know that they were playing like a million notes perfectly because it just comes out of the speakers as you know, just white noise. Um, but yeah, and then here we come, playing, waiting for the rain. Exactly. Uh, I remember, you know, a long time ago I went to a, what was it?

Oz mist. And some of the bands were like that, you know, in your, in like a shine arena or whatever. And it, it, I, the band, I remember sounding exactly like that was Slipknot and I know slip nod is, you know, they're not bad, I guess. But they that's exactly what their show sounded like. You couldn't, you couldn't hear any differentiation between guitar or vocals or anything.

It was just static. Like, like that's all you heard from the speakers for like 45 minutes. And it's just, I don't understand people that are like that. I mean, speaking of hardcore bands, Ben's brothers in , uh, was in a, what was the name of the surviving thalia? Yes. Diane nemesis. That's what it was. I remember him.

Yeah. Yeah. They were, they were tight. They were great. Yeah. Shout out to you individual notes. I remember that. So, yeah, I think that's , uh, that dynamic led to what I think was the greatest joke we always did, which was right before playing like , um, either like waiting for the rain or , um, Oh gosh, what's that one song.

Uh, bap , bap, bap , bap, bap , feel, feel, yeah. Yeah. Uh, where we will be like this next song is called jeez, Rob clean D chord. Yeah. There was a little bit of boom, but yeah, we did we some split. Yeah. Right. Look, some of our songs definitely had like some kick to it. Um, but. I just really enjoyed that joke specifically, right?

Yeah. Cause I mean, cause we would play shows, especially when we would play it like tech world or something like that . Like, you know, when you, when you're playing, like trying to get four bands together on a ticket, you're trying to get good bands that don't necessarily sound exactly the same, but kind of flow together.

And there weren't a lot of. Other bands to choose from. That sounded like we did, you know, cause we couldn't play. Like, it'd be like three of those hardcore metal bands in than us. And it would be, people are like, what the fuck? It says, people are leaving like halfway through the first song. Like I came here to hear people yell and what is this?

You know? Well, we were like , like, I feel like that was kind of one of the biggest detriments for us. And what's weird is like wanted to do more of that. Like I wanted to scream more and do more of that stuff, you know, but I didn't know how to write that music. You know. Um, but yeah , uh, and we started getting there, like with Envy and things, you know, it started to get heavier.

Um, but for the most part, we were like , all, all, turn it up, pop. If anything, like. Yeah. I think like my, my musical influences at the time, I mean, I was listening to a lot of just like in life during that time, I was probably listening primarily to Dave Matthews band, Jimmy eat world. Yeah, those are probably like the top two with, you know, obviously I was always listening to the Beatles that's always happening.

Um, and then like Weezer. Um, perfect. So, so yeah, but I've, I feel like in my mind, in general, I wanted to, to do more like acoustic II, like Dave Matthews band stuff, but then at the other end, like more like weirder Sonic stuff with like Jimmy world. Um, And , uh, not so much in like the, in the emo realm, but definitely with more, just like playing around Sonic with like, just, yeah.

Yeah. Just like more, more interesting stuff from my like notes standpoint, there's two guitars, bass and drums. Or at least just like getting like really into like some like effects, you know, and like playing around with just like , um, not so much like looping, but oops. You know what I mean?

On a side note, you and me are starting to do that a little bit. I think I could be wrong, did you listen to the new song that we did, Mike? Oh, no, I completely did not look at it, but I will listen to it today. I promise. I promise I will. Well, if you've listened to the podcast, it's the intro.

Oh, okay. I haven't actually listened to your podcast. I've only heard like little clips of it on Facebook . He's going to have to listen to this one. It's funny. So , um, dimension. Oh, we were speaking of Beatles influence. Like we did a whole podcast on that as well. So , uh, Oh, I'll have to go back and listen to it.

Yeah. We post we post , uh, Sergeant pepper versus Pearl Jam's 10, which one is a better album, which is an argument that should never be made. No, what's your vote? I mean, On 10 over Sergeant peppers. Are we talking about better as in, uh , just, just overall a better album or more influential on the face of music?

Because I don't know if you could even answer that second. Which one do you like more? I probably like Sergeant pepper is better. To be honest. If I had to pick which one I've listened to more, I would go with Sergeant Peppers. Um, Yeah, not to say that, but yeah. That's like , you're, you're trying to argue, you know, who's a better Michael Jordan or LeBron James they're, you know, it's kind of hard to pick one.

Although people argue about it all the time. Oh, I don't know how common that argument is. Yeah. It's super common, but you don't do sports. So I meant, I meant Pearl Jam vs a a a , uh, the Beatles. Oh, tan versus Sergeant Bevers. Yeah. And I don't think I've ever had anybody ask me that specific question before. So that's why , uh, when I, when I brought it up to Jacob, it was like this, this will be a fun topic because it should be, you know, 10 versus nevermind or

Yeah. It should be like Sergeant pepper versus pet sounds, but right. Yeah, let's take two things that should not be put up against each other. Oh, you should do a nevermind versus pet sounds one now. Oh, God only knows. So you guys have pet sounds is way more depressing than I was anticipating.

I've listened to it all the way through a couple of years ago for the first time in forever. And you're right. It's kind of a sad bastard kind of. I love it. It's so good. I was like, Oh gosh. I mean , like, , my, my beach boys knowledge not there. Right. Um, so yeah, I had to like go back probably like three, four years ago and I was like, I'm going to make a conscious effort.

And I listen to pet sounds all the way through a handful of times. Um, just, you know, just to really kind of dive in. And it's so good. There's some real melancholy in there and yeah, it's pretty rad. It's pretty rad. That was the number one takeaway when I heard it again, I was like, God, this is sad.

This album is sad. I haven't listened to it again. I haven't listened to. Okay. I haven't listened to those in forever, but , uh, you guys had some of the same influences when we were in the band together. Uh, that's probably true. The Jim, Mike, what are your top three influences world? Jimmy world is number one.

My favorite band of all time. You did not know that. Yes. I mean, I had an inkling. We always did that. If you miss, then we did play that song. Didn't we, I wouldn't know. It was like transitioned into some other songs. But it was the screaming of though. Yeah, exactly. Um, if I could have joined like a Jimmy world, like tribute band at the time, I totally would have.

Cause their songs are just, they're so good. They really are. And I've only seen them live one time in my life and it makes me sad because , uh, and I'll tell you about it real quick. It was at Bogarts up in Cincy and it was the 10th anniversary futures tour. Hmm. And so this is more recent. It was more recent.

Yeah. So it was God like six or seven years ago. Maybe, maybe not even that Bogart still there. Do you think? Um, I don't see why they wouldn't be, they were there. They're one of the hot places in the region of the day. It's a big room. I've been there for a couple of shows.

We saw GreenWheel there one time we went together. Yeah, that was fun. I mean, they're, they've got a big, lower level and then they've got like a big upper deck where you can stand. That's got like a full bar and everything. It's a pretty decent sized venue. Okay. What'd you say? Like headliners, headliners.

I'd say it's bigger than headliners, but not by much. They have blinders on a quarter. Kind of more along the line of the old Jillian's probably about that big. So maybe a little bigger. I don't know. I can't really tell in my head the spatial dimensions isn't there anymore, but they were, they were awesome.

Oh no. Jillian's that, that building has been so many things. And now I don't know if they're even anything. The one in Louisville. Yeah. The one in the wall. It's diamonds pub that's right. Yeah. Okay. Cool, but the other diamonds is still there. Right? The one in St. Matthews, I think so. So , why do you think you'd like to meet world so much?

You know what? I don't know. It's hard to imagine, like music clicks with me. Like I'm not, I'm not a super deep listener with music. Like I'm not looking for music to, you know, make me feel well, you always look for music to make you feel a certain way, but I'm not like looking for super deep meaning behind the lyrics, not to say that Jimmy world doesn't have.

Deep meaning by their letters, maybe they do. I'm just not the kind of person that goes and tries to seek it out. It's not my, Oh, this music is really speaking to me in this very specific way. And it's, I just, I've just liked, I like their, I like their groovy tunes, man. You know, that's kinda just how it was.

Yeah. Um, I feel the same way about foo fighters. I really like foo fighters. And I think Dave Grohl is the first one to tell you, he's like, I think I saw an interview with him even where he said something like our songs don't really have any meaning. Like people would come up like, Oh, your songs were so meaningful to me.

And he's like, that's weird. Cause we just kind of thought it sounded good. And we wrote it and we played it and that was good. So I think they've gotten more as they have gone. Speaking of food fighters, there's the longer they've gone on in a career, they've gotten a little bit more. I don't know what word I'm looking for here, but their music has definitely changed.

It's not just the hard rock, like it used to be, you know, back with Everlong and you know, the color and the shape album and all that. But , um, I don't know. I just like music. That sounds good. More than anything more than, you know, whether it's meaningful or not, which is why , uh, Jacob, you know, I didn't like me very much because Jason Bourne yesterday songs are so deep and meaningful.

I would say they were not deep in meaningful. I would say they were all about breakups. That's true. Um , as, as it were already halfway to being an emo band. Yeah. Well then the heavier stop that I was starting to write, I think was getting deeper, but yeah, we didn't quite get there. I don't think.

My musical influences obviously were , um, you know, we covered them in the podcast a little bit with , uh, Pearl jam. That was a huge influence for me. And, um , Uh, actually Hootie and the Blowfish was, was a big influence. And I think that's probably where like the cheesy songs kind of came from.

And then , um, you know, and then as it progressed , uh, what was , uh, what was that band that I always say I was stabbing westward. I don't know why I love that sound, but it just sounds so cool to me. Like just sonically, there's that kind of a nine inch nails? I think, I think part of, part of the issue.

And this is all, you know, coming to my head right now. But if we had potentially been a little older or if there was another Avenue, I think we, I think we naturally drifted toward the heavier, like trying to make our stuff heavier than maybe it should have been for two reasons, one playing at tech world.

And that being the place where the all ages shows. You know , and, and early on, cause I feel like as tech world kind of drifted, we started playing the twice, told out in Oldham County more and I feel like our , um, our pop alternative vibe was, was more appreciated out there. Right, right. Um, and then, and then I think, I think Ryan's writing style.

With, like how fantastical, it was also lent itself to maybe having like a harder edge to it in that like , uh, fantasy metal kind of way, you know, like , um, like it's not full blown, like hero's journey songs, but it's, you know, some of that stuff was like Epic. Yeah, Epic in nature. So , so, you know, had some of those things not been there , like, would we have drifted toward more of that fighters or lower?

Yeah. Like, and then once we started playing, then emo came in real hard. So you know this, when you started to dashboard . Yeah, we were, we were almost on the verge of being emo trendsetters, but we just didn't quite get there. Right. Weren't pretty enough. No, just hands down. And our drummer wanted to be in a punk band, right.

Basically. Yeah. It's your story? So. You know, all four of us were in different bands. Hmm. That sounds like you two could have been in the same band. We were, I mean, as far as goofy people go, right. Mike and I were, were I think, more closely aligned, which had been in like bare naked ladies together or something.

Yes. Yeah. Yeah, definitely. Definitely. I just remember there was a couple of times where I would just like be jumping around like an absolute fool. In the middle of the song. And then afterward Jacob would be like, did you know that song is about like death or suicide or something like that? I kind of really I'm , uh, I'm up there.

They're like smiling and jumping around and stuff. And then I'm like, Oh, that does. My vibe did not fit where that went. I wasn't, like, we didn't have a very contained image as a band. Just kind of, kind of all over the place. Yeah. If we would have just had this meeting before we started the band, I think we'd in a lot better.

Yeah. Yeah. Let's go back in time, back 20 years. We could figure out what we wanted to do. I was speaking of music, what are you listening to now? Same. Yeah, I kind of just listen to the same stuff. I mean, Oh God, if I had to pick, I don't even, I couldn't even name a newer band that I'm listening to.

Um, I listened to DJ X a lot in the car because my daughter really likes it. So I hear newer popper, like top 40 type stuff all the time, but I couldn't. Identify any of the bands or anything like that. I'm just like, okay, this is fine. I guess. On my own. I'd listened to, Oh, I have a Spotify playlist.

I call ultra mix and it's Scott. A couple of thousand songs on it. And it's stuff from the nineties. It's stuff from the eighties, it's stuff from now from the two thousands, it's just an amalgamation of shit. And it's 95% stuff. I've listened to my entire life. And that's kind of just my go-to , uh, Spotify list.

So if you, if you want to hear Mike's , uh, Spotify playlist, just type in Ulta mix. Well, I'll have to share it. I don't think I have it shared, but I'll , uh, I'll make that available in public and I'll tweet it. I'll tweet it out on my, yeah. Tweet it because , uh, because your Twitter, there is a fake kolesla, one word I know.

And , uh, and then people can listen to your playlists. I'm a terrible social media user. So don't expect tweets every day. No, no, but I mean just for this purpose , uh, yeah, right. And then, and then to , um, Ben, you were saying, what are you listening to these days? Uh, okay. So let's see. At this point for me too.

Um, it takes a lot to introduce a new band or a new album into the mix and have it stick , um, in the last couple of years , uh, you know, Derek and the dominoes, Laila and other songs, other assorted songs and things. Technically what the album's called. Um, it is so depressing. Uh, and it's basically the album he wrote for George Harrison's wife , uh, to try to convince her, to leave George Harrison and get with him. Uh, so that's why it's, it's , it's, it's the most , like, you know, 20 something year old in love with his best friend's wife flag, rip your heart out and be led.

But will you love me? And it's it's, it's just it's yeah, it sounds to me like that should only be one song at the most. And this guy. Yeah, no, it's definitely like , uh, I'm going to fly down to Miami and, you know, put this, put this band together and do this album and then , uh, like party and be sad about the situation.

So that album has , uh, is one that , like, I just had been, you know, I have known about it growing up and. I had never listened to it from beginning to end until a couple of years ago. And I was like, wow. So any new music or just a dirty projectors, 30 protectors you've heard of dirty projectors.

You heard? Oh, I mean, they've been around a long time. Uh, but they , uh, they started to get popular. I feel like around like 2010 , uh, in the like Brooklyn area. Um, I mean, it's kind of like alternative ish. No, it's more like indie indie rock. Um, they used to have these two vocalists , uh, so it's mainly this one dude.

And , uh, he plays guitar and sings. He's a very interesting guitar player. Like there's like a, there's like a staccato kind of nature to his guitar playing. That's really interesting. Um, and, uh , Um, and he had these two vocalists , um, who these ladies were amazing. Uh, they were on the Roots, picked them up and put them on one of their songs , um, for one of their albums and like 2012, something like that.

Um so they're two voices plus his, and then they had a third voice , uh, this lady who was playing keyboards and just like the mixture of all their voices was great. So they put on an album called bit Orca , uh, around 2010. That's awesome. And then about like six months to a year later, they put out like an E P with Bjork.

Called Mount Wittenberg Orca. That is phenomenally good. It's so good. Um, it's weird though. Like you have to listen to bit Orca first to get a sense of what's going on and then listen to Mellon versus like a concept , um, kind of it's it's basically like the, the. That EP was written for like specific kind of events to like save the whales or some crap.

Um, and , uh, so it was more of a, it was like, it was put together for this live thing. And then they were like , well, let's just record it too. And, or at least that's how I, I think the story went. Okay. Those two ladies have since left the band and there's some new vocalists in , um, but the dudes obviously still there and their new stuff is, it rocks too?

Like it's vocally. Very interesting. It's a lot of fun. Cool. Yeah. And then , uh, you know, Beatles, Radiohead, Allmen brothers, and , uh, occasionally a little John Coltrane. Okay. So like you guys are like, so bream love, so preen kind of listening to the same music. Kind of, I mean, I'm not listening to Coltrane well , so,

okay. Well, I don't listen to music that often, but like I've been listening to like even harder stuff, like tool and , uh, breaking Benjamin recently, like a lot , um, Yeah, like tool just came out with an album called and knock you list or something like that. Like before all of this break right before all this stuff hit.

So it's just like, it's creepy and weird and awesome. And like, those guys are so talented and make music in like the complete opposite way that I make music, where they like, you know, practice and make the song a hundred percent perfect and different time signatures and all this stuff. And then they record it live, you know , um, Which is like the opposite of how I'm making music now, or we are, where are you even making music?

Can we just record something and then loop it and hope it works? You know? So , uh, yeah. Go to some of these pictures , pictures, pictures. Okay. Uh, so this was just the venue. This is , uh, the venue. We started playing at a bunch cause we worked there , uh, which was pretty fun.

This has been, we rehearsed and my family's attic , uh, which was, I think this at the time might've been my bedrooms.

It had a bed in it for awhile. I don't remember. I think you moved to the basement. Yeah , yeah, yeah. I remember the first show, the first sister out of her room a couple of times. Yeah. That seemed to happen a couple of times. Yeah. I remember I think the very first practice cyber went to this was before Ben.

It was in the basement and that basement is so small. I can't believe we could get a drum set in there, you know? Right, right. It was a terrible room and it was, it was a weirdly like narrow and long. And so it was not an ideal place to play music. Like we couldn't stand together, stand around the corner.

Yeah. While we were practicing. So that was a weird space. That was fun though. I remember, I think , uh, there's a song I wrote down there in the basement that , uh, we never played. Uh , Hmm, let me, and I don't know, last time did we ever play last time?

Cause he was like, I remember recording it with you or something. That name sounds familiar for a song. Yeah. It was like, it was like a, it was like an edge we ever played it. Like, it was like, yeah, it was like an edgy emo pop song, but like we never played it. Yeah. Uh, there's a Koleslaw at the tech is that tech world looks like, yeah, that's a tech world.

Yeah. You can see the, the Cielo ceiling. Oh, right. Yeah. The drop ceiling. Yeah. That was , uh, I really liked, I liked plaque then, you know, I really liked playing there because the sound system was so great. You know? Yeah. The sound was great there. Uh, this is, I liked the crowds at the twice. Told Oldham County more.

Uh . I feel like those, those teenagers. Really dug what we were. I kind of feel like if they were coming out to see us at , uh, twice told in Oldham, they actually wanted to see us. They weren't just showing up the tech world on a Friday night. Like they do. I think it was the people who were already going.

I think this was Oldham County kids who were already going to be at the twice told I just think that our music, our music fit them a little bit more. That makes sense. Fit the tech world grass outside of, outside of the people that we brought. Right. Speaking of the Oldham County twice told I ha there's a recording of us playing live.

And I think what I'm going to do is extract the songs from it and maybe put it on , uh, the band. There is a born yesterday band camp page. And so I'll probably put the songs of that on here and I'll just make them for free for everybody. So if anybody wants to hear what we used to sound like, you can go to the , uh, born yesterday five Oh two.band camp.com.

Wow. Now, is there any way to get that onto the Spotify guys? Uh, It's certainly possible. I'm not sure that I feel comfortable. Like it's just not my best. It's not our best. It's just, you know , um, but for sure for now it was, it was a piece in, in time. Yeah. I'll, I'll work on it. I'll see if I can clean it up.

Good enough to get on Spotify. I have some of the , uh, like the studio recordings on , um, on a. What's it called on a SoundCloud page somewhere , so, hopefully you can post that. I'm going to tweet it right now. Well, after the show, I'll remember to tweet, I'm going to write tweet my notepad and good.

Speaking of the right. I will do that later, which is the original line, the original lineup. When I used to have hair. Uh, this is Ryan here. This is the, the most talented songwriter I know right here in the front. Uh, then that's me in the second spot. And then Ben lovely, who played drums , uh, at the beginning.

And there's Mikey back there in the back. That's me. Yeah. Um, I remember take, go back to that picture where it's the four of us. Cause I want to talk about it real quick. Um, I remember specifically, and I don't remember why, but you told me for the image. Cause we have other pictures from the set somewhere and I don't remember where they are.

I probably haven't told everyone, but go ahead. Yeah. Go ahead. You told everybody to, yeah, you're right. You told everybody to wear like a different unique outfit and you had a plan for all, all of you, including yourself. And then we show up for the photo shoot and I'm the only one that did it. Right. And so everybody else is just wearing like a shirt.

And jeans and looks normal and I'm over here wearing this weird black thing. I remember that outfit and it had like gold dragons on the front of it.That's awesome. It is. I don't even remember where I got it. It, I don't want to say it was silk, but it was kind of like almost a , uh, like a. Like a Japanese style type of outfit.

And so I'm wearing that everybody else is just wearing like shirt and jeans and I'm like, Oh, cool. Yeah, I look great. we go shopping, like for all of us or something. Like, I don't know. It was crazy. I was like , you, you had this whole , like, I was trying to like biscuit, Westmoreland plan, where you had one guy in the band that was just a weirdo and you wanted it to be me no And that was kind of what, what we talked about. And didn't never. It never really went anywhere.

Yeah. I would never do that to you now. And I'm really sorry. Oh, thanks, please. Forgive me. I'd be more open to do it now though. So Wes Borland sounds awesome. Yeah, I haven't thought about that guy in ages. Did it all for the cookie. I haven't thought about him I went and since, until his name just came out of my mouth, to be honest.

So wild. This is a fun picture. We did this at , uh, the studio. Um, this was, who knows when this was, it seems like , uh, Ben was there at some point, right? So we could have all been simply remember being so tired and laying down on the floor and playing, waiting for the rain. You laying down on the floor a few times playing songs, to be honest.

Well, yeah, I was lazy, right? Yeah. Yeah. So we just didn't have like a, what is the word I'm looking for? Like a, a cohesive. Uh, goal, you know, if we just would've said, Hey, let's try to become this or be this, or, you know, or what do you want to do? And like, try to put it all together in a thing. Like, , uh, we might've got to the next level, you know , like, cause that, that last show we did at Jillian's was really good.

Like , uh, I poured my heart out on Island. Nobody were really wanting to make decisions and then you would just make decisions by default and we would just want like, yeah, that sounds fine. Uh, this was a fun show too, but yeah, it was fun. Uh, Ben was at work. Yup. Took a little break from work to play, even wearing your name tag and you've learned, man.

It's awesome. That's awesome. That was fun. That was fun. It was actually a good chunk of people in the audience there. I remember that was, was that the , um, I know we played a couple shows at Kentucky kingdom. Um, one of them was where they did that thing where they were like 200 bands in one day or something like that.

It was that one because I had worked, I had worked all throughout the night. Yeah. Because they had done it a couple of times and this one was like, this was like, this was the one in front of the pool though. This was the one in front of the pool. This is the stage in front of us. The big one though.

Technically the biggest show we ever played. Right? I think so. Just because everybody in hurricane count people there. Yes. There were a lot of people there. Um, as we played me and Ryan played a show here. Where we were on the stage. Were you in the band, Mike? Um, I was not at the band. I was the possibly the only time I saw you guys live before I joined the yeah.

And I was like using the synthesizer and everything, like on the guitar? Yes. You were using the synthesize and you had your, you had the guitar with the , uh, with the assistance hookup on it. Yeah. And I think Ryan had a keyboard. Uh, I think he was playing bass, but maybe he had a keyboard. Yeah. He was playing the bass, but I think he had a keyboard and he played like the intro song and then he would start playing the bass.

Yeah , yeah, yeah , yeah, yeah. It was a while. It was this totally stage. Was that , uh, it was that it was in like Northwest territory. I was the one, it was the, the amphitheater, the one with the, the regular stage or whatever, the Looney tunes, amphitheater, the loonie James amphitheater. Yeah. That was fun about that.

Yeah. Okay. I think that's, that's all I got here. Oops. I just closed the picture. Uh, yeah. So , uh, those are the , uh, pictures. So if you've got to watch this , uh, on the screen, that was us , um, born yesterday, five Oh two.band camp.com to hear some of the old songs there. Tweet that out.

I'm kind of surprised this is going so smooth.

Sometimes me and Ben have some major hiccups are I do. And then Ben has to fill in. Uh, yeah. So anything else rant about hamburgers? I mean, I have thoughts on pizza and I just want to go in and they're right in. Okay. So, so this is based on the last two weeks ago, your podcast where you were talking about what kind of pizza you get, and you said you like to get dominoes and you tell me if I'm in the mood for, for filler pizza.

Yes. Yes. If I'm getting filler pizza, it's going to be dominoes. Just wanted to point out that Domino's is also my favorite filler pizza place. Um, I hate Papa. John's Papa John's is garbage. It's hot. I mean, I know I'm in Louisville and we're supposed to love Papa John's cause it's everywhere, but it's crap.

It was great. 20 years ago, 25 years ago when I was a kid. Now it's just, the cheese is gross and the sauce is gross. And the crust crust has never been up to par. It's just, it used to be, it used to be decent filler pizza though. Like you could eat a Papa John's and be like, this is okay. And now it's just, it's it's so bad.

It's so bad. And. I hope Papa John's is Elizabeth to be like, cancel these guys. But no, I don't like I'd much rather have Papa John's has their own problems right now. They got a red light flashing on it. People are talking by this on a podcast, so let's take care of them. Yeah. They do have their own problems right now.

I worked with a girl who. A few years ago, I'm not going to go into too many details. I worked with a girl who was friends with one of Papa John's as children. And basically every story you've heard about him just being a douche, a hundred percent true. He's just, just a Dick bag. So , um, I was heard that and I'm like, okay, cool , good, good to know.

So in summation, don't eat Papa. John's go get dominoes and said pizza. It's okay. You have to be in a mood for pizza hut. If we're going to have this column, then we're going to have this conversation. I have to, I have to insert the greatest pizza that me and my wife just found recently is this place called Coals it's very fancy.

Oh, yes. The coals. Yeah, the brick, the brick pizza. It's it's it's like fine dining on a pizza. It's amazing. Really? Yeah. I've never heard of this place where there like a, like a blaze kind of deal. No, no , it's, it's literally fine dining on a pizza. So , uh, yeah, so it's like caviar and lobster beats. It's it's it's some good stuff.

It's really great. Um , just, just so we're all clear. This is C O L S right? Yes. Not the department store

Oh, I wrote down Coles, C O L E like a fire burning coal. So yeah, it's it's is a top-notch. Uh, shout out to you guys. Thank you for making such good pizza. Um, I wish they were bigger. They're kind of small, but , uh, they're definitely delicious. Um, Ben mentioned local places. He likes some pillows areas, which I Impellas areas is not my favorite place, but they're pretty good.

Um, my favorite local is Oz on Bardstown road. We were looking for a new pizza place a few weeks ago and I'd had them before and I was like, let's get XOs and we got it. And we were just all like, Oh God, this is so good. So is our go-to non-local place. It's it's a New York style, right? Um, yeah, I mean it's well, no, I wouldn't call it New York style.

It's just, I don't know what to call it. I just call it normal pizza pizza. It's not that much different from a pillow series. Yeah. It's just, you know, not too thick, not too thin, not too big, not too small. Just to size. Yeah, I'll tell you what boom boss is. My they're they're they're, they're climbing up the ladder.

There I'll have to in a while because I always thought they were a little too expensive. Like they're, they're a little pricier than other places and I'm a cheapskate. And , um, it was, it was cool to go there when they have like the tap house. So you gotta to get the good beer to go with the pizza. But as far as like ordering it to go, it's like, they're not.

Not what I want. Eventually the world's going to open up and we can go to a restaurant. I'll probably go to Bombas, but they're not on my, on my list. Right? Not on your carry out to jets. Jets is one of my favorite jets is fantastic. Eight corners is fantastic. Detroit style. Okay. It's not that just doesn't taste bad, but the fact that they charge extra for certain toppings is totally weird to me.

And , uh, Upsets me, but every time I'm like, Oh, that'd be a lot of places do that. Pizza's $15, but yeah, they charge per topping. But, but also if it's like chicken, it's extra in addition to the pro topping, you know what I mean? So it's like double upcharge when I was at sky zoned jets was our pizza provider for the last, like two years.

, uh, so every birthday party. Would come with pizza. So there was just constantly jets pizza coming in and out. And then, you know, you have a party that doesn't show up, but then their pizza shows up and then somebody has got to eat this thing. Jet's pizza, which, you know, the prior two years it had been Papa John's.

Um, so I did eat a, a fair amount of Papa John's. But jets was such an upgrade. Yeah. Oh yeah. Every heat so much better reheat, so much better than, yeah. It's so good. Don't get me wrong. I just wish they would just average there. We only got cheese or pepperoni. Yeah. Why can't they average the cost? So no premium ingredients, little kids aren't getting, you know, artichokes on their pizza or right.

You know what I'm saying? Like the difference between a ser, you know, like even sausage, I think was a premium and grab, I'm not sure, but it just seemed like a lot half of their ingredients are premium. So I was like, you know, a double upcharge, like, why can't they just average it? Do you know what I mean?

Is that that hard?

And I'm going to make your money. I had one more pizza note and that is, I do not like Chicago style pizza at all. It's I mean, I'll eat it. It's cause it's still pizza. I hate the, it it's offensive that you have to use a knife and a fork to me, like a piece of pizza, you should be able to hold and eat.

That's kind of the whole point of pizza. And so when it becomes a sit down weird casserole meal, I don't want to have to deal with it. Um, Now I will, I will say though, I've never actually been to Chicago, so I've never had real Chicago style pizza from one of the famous Chicago places like UNOS or something.

Yeah. Something like that. Is that where we went? Where did we go? Mike? A couple of times the pizza place who knows? I mean, there used to be an UNOS on Fern Creek. I don't know if there are any, where did we go eat pizza? That was like kind of deep dish. Mean, I've eaten so much peace in my life.

I have no idea what you're talking about. Wow. Is that place on Westport road over by Tinseltown? Oh , um, old Chicago, old Chicago. Yeah. It's a little salty greasy, but it's good. I don't remember. But if I've ever had pizza from in there though, cause I would always get, they had these little pepperoni popper bite things and then I would get lasagna.

So. Yeah. I don't know. This is all right. Sorry. You can. Uh, so there's a place called Lou Malnati's right there in Chicago and you can literally have them mail you a pizza, but yeah, it's, it comes frozen and then you just pop it in the oven. Uh, it's pretty rad. I got the sausage and it's literally like, if this is the pie, the.

There's just one giant sausage Patty that's like that big. Right. And so it's just like big sausage Patty. Crust. And then they just put all the stuff on top of it. Uh, pretty rad do read right now. It's also like it's also like 60 bucks to have them send you this pizza. I was going to say where's the other shoe here?

Yeah, there's definitely a another shoe so we can get, we could get it in the mail, like official Chicago style pizza. Yeah , well, that's awesome. I mean, that sounds like a good idea for a future podcast where everybody tastes the luminol, these , uh, sausage hockey puck pizza. Yeah. Why not? All right, Jacob's gone. This is something I always felt Jacob could appreciate is a lot of modern, you know, recording techniques were first done by the Beatles and done by, you know, like the beach boys and stuff like that.

Like, you didn't have digital processing or anything like that. , you know, it was called, you know, tape, you know, they were literally like pulling on the audio tape to create sound effects and stuff like that. And they were, they were slowing down, takes to make it fit the right key because, you know , um, it's , um, there's a strawberry fields.

The first half of the song is in one key and the other half of the song is in another key. And I just speed one up and slow the other down to put them in the same key. Brilliant, right. Nobody was doing that shit at the time. Or maybe everybody was in the Beatles were just the ones everybody remembers, you know , uh, I read Jeff Emmerich's book , uh, called here, there, and everywhere it is , um, it he's, he was basically like the lead engineer for the , uh, revolver.

Pepper misery tour and half of the white album until he quit in the middle of the white album, because that was quite hated. Everybody hated each other. And he was like, this is a toxic environment I'm leaving. Um, but yeah. Great, great book, highly recommend. Uh, Jacob, I recommend to you as well. If you're in a reading mood , uh, read here, there, and everywhere, but Geoff Emerick fixed.

Uh, he was the. Uh, nonfiction here. He was the lead engineer for the Beatles during , uh, like the most productive, productive, most important albums. Uh, and it's a lot of just like him going into some of the weird recording techniques that they used. That's awesome. Yeah. To make that sound interesting. Sounds like I won't remember.

So I'm going to go ahead and save it. I'm going to go ahead and get it. Uh, Geoff Emerick. How do you spell it? Uh, G E O F F British Jeff E M E R I C K. I believe

Yeah. At one point, at one point , uh, John Lennon comes in and he says, I want my voice to sound like , uh, a monk on a mountaintop. This is why we're recording tomorrow. Never knows. And then he just like, went off lunch. You got to get the, uh , the, the , uh, Ricola filter. Right. So they , uh, they had an amp where I think the speaker spun inside.

Yeah. I can't remember what, what are those called? Like they are called rotary cabinets. They had like a nickname to the Lesley cabinets, you know, that's what they, Leslie. That's what I was looking for. Yeah, which you can now simulate with a click of a button. Yeah. Good times for us. Yeah. While you were gone that, you know, the Beatles had a lot of stuff happened now it's literally just like a button you Bush and there, they had to like, you know, physically move equipment around in certain ways to get the sound.

Yeah. It's wild, man. Like, Music technology is weird now, man, it's like AI just hit a button, like it mixes for you kind of, I mean, now people can like record albums on their cell phones. Yeah. That's true. Walking around, hitting that, that little app with the beats going like, Oh, I got the new music now.

Yep. New mixtape.

All right. So Mike, how old is your daughter now? She's eight. She's eight. Okay. So in 10 years he's like, no, let's call it eight years and eight years. She's 16. She's like, dad, I want to learn how to play the bass and be in a band. What are you going to tell her? Absolutely, of course. Okay. But like what, what kind of tips are you going to give her?

Where are you? God, it shouldn't be the last person telling anybody you're going to put her through like a whole school of rock situation. Oh, no, I would definitely not do that. Um, I would tell her Sarah, the Maxwell, see my, I feel like my band experience is not , uh, the same as a lot of other people's bands experiences, because like, you know, , uh, everybody in our band was all for all intents and purposes, pretty chill.

And we weren't super big. And so it's like, we never , like, you know, once you get to a certain level as a band, you start having other people, maybe shady people trying to influence you for their own nefarious means. And lucky for us. We never got to that point. Nope. We were the only nefarious shady people around.

Yeah. So our, our experience was , uh, a lot more laid back, but if she actually learned to join a band and start , um, You know, maybe getting more successful and having other people come around and trying to use you to do stuff. I want her to just, you know, hopefully be smart, use your head and don't just say yes to people.

And this sounds like I'm doing some sort of like antisexual abuse thing, but no, what I mean is just, you know, don't just sign, don't just sign anything. If some guy comes up to you and says, Oh, here's a. You know, here's a contract where you make some money. Why don't you just come sign? I can make you a star.



So in the whole, like being a parent realm, I mean, at this point, She's eight. So she's definitely heard the Beatles, right? Oh yeah. Definitely. Like she's pretty well versed. I mean, a lot of the beetles can be characterized as children, music. Uh, you get like altogether now one, two, three, four, you know? Um, so at what point do you go from all right, this is just music that plays in the house or whatever to, okay.

Now we're going to sit down. And we're going to listen to revolver from beginning to end. I think she's probably at least a few years off of that because , um, she's kind of very , um, think of what words she's kind of flighty and she's not very , um, She's not going to have the attention span. She doesn't really have, even at eight, she doesn't really have the attention span for that kind of thing.

Like if I were to tell her, we're going to sit here, we're going to have the TV turned off and you can't look at your tablet and you can't look at a book and we're just going to listen to this music for 45 minutes. So she would probably say. 30 seconds and I'm bored. Can we go do something? So she's not quite to that point where you can just, I mean, you know, we obviously can just listen to music.

I mean, I don't normally listen to music, just listening to music. I'm usually doing other things, but if I had to, if somebody told me, you know, held a gun in your head, okay, you gotta sit down and listen to this album for 15 minutes. I'd be okay. And I would sit and listen to it and think about it. But yeah, she's definitely.

A few years out from that. And I kind of don't necessarily think it's her. I think it's more of just the, the condition of the world. Um, cause like our parents would complain about us watching too much TV or playing too many video games right now. And now the complaint is, Oh, everybody's on their phones or their tablets or whatever.

And it's just, it's just how it is. And , the cat's out of the bag. There's nothing you can do about it. At this point. We're not going to go back to making our kids stay outside, pushing a hoop with a stick anymore. You know, it's just the weight of the world has , uh, come down upon us.

And now we are, you know, we're looking at our phones all the time and it just is what it is. So then dopamine hits. Yeah. Yeah, exactly. Got to get the dopamine hits, got to, you got to crush all the candies and , um, do all this. The Duke is and all that stuff. So whatever you do on your phones, read all the Reddits.

You've got to upvote all the rest. Just scroll, scroll. Keep scrolling. Yes. And then how much T swizzle are you listening to these days? Keith whistle. Yeah. She, she got you on that Taylor Swift. Oh, teeth with, Oh, I was going to bring Taylor Swift up. Wasn't I , um, whenever it comes on the radio, I hear it. And I have a very specific complaint about Taylor Swift.

Um, just the way, the way, the way you just kind of sank into it. Oh, I got to think about it. Whatever Taylor Swift. Yeah. Um, so I don't really have a problem with Taylor Swift. Um, as a, as a musical artist. , if you think about her as just like another person on the radio, she makes her music.

It's very poppy, it's top 40 stuff. You know, she has hits their number one, whatever, if you think about it like that, Taylor Swift is fine. My biggest problem is there are a lot of people out there that think that she's a complete musical genius and as the second coming of Christ and that her music is the best and her shit doesn't stink.

And that she's just amazing. And I'm just like, she's so. Average. She's so boring and average. I mean, she's talented enough, but it's not like she's the greatest guitarist ever. It's not like she has the greatest singing voice ever. Who does? I don't know. I mean, when you're trying to compare it to a wreath or something, you know, obviously not, but I feel like there are so many people that just live and die by Taylor Swift.

It bothers me. she's not a musical genius. That's my point. She's not a musical genius. She's a marketing genius. I'll tell you that she has some really good people out there that are running her business for her. You know, those are the people that should have been running born yesterday.

Right. So , uh, so that's just my biggest problem with her is that she, if she were just fine and nobody, you know, just. Everybody just listened to her like a normal band. That'd be fine, but they're just people that are crazy for her. And I just don't get it, but I'm sure there are a lot of other bands out there like that Taylor Swift is that she's a marketing genius.

Yeah. That's I guess that's kind of my problem. Yeah. She's a marketing genius. She's a personality, I think is what happened. Yeah. I bet that's the thing. Anytime I've ever seen her in an interview, she's just so dull and like vanilla, like in her music is just dull and vanilla and it's like, Oh, she was writing guitar songs when she was 12 years old.

And I'm like , well, she doesn't. Sound like she's actually matured any hurt, as long as all the sound kind of the same, like all the new ones. I hear sound kind of the same average, this of the ones I heard when she started out. So it's like, I don't know. And I'm going to get all kinds of shit. People want to be like, I'm not saying I hate Taylor West people listening to our podcasts.

So all, all the people that listen to this podcast now are going to be tweeting at me being like you hate Taylor Swift. I'm going to come here and ask this your ass. I'm like, yeah. , you know, this is the thing that like, I, you know, I don't know if you know how to hold another brand, but get songs done that where I'm exploring these, you know, music sick is all about four chords and it has been forever and

I think the majority of the population just doesn't understand that , like, it does not take that much to make a song, you know? No, it does it doesn't. And, but you do have certain bands whose, you know, whether it's marketing. Cause I know in marketing applied , uh, plays with a lot of different artists, you know, they look for their, their people and there's genre and they have their own, you know, images like, like say Billie Eilish, for example, like she has an image and she's selling that image and you know, her music is fine and you know, Taylor Swift music is fine, but it's like they have this certain particular image.

And sometimes I. Have a problem with it. And sometimes I don't and it has, this was, I don't, I guess I don't really have a problem with Taylor Swift. I just wanted to bitch about her because people talk about her so much and I'm tired of it. You have a problem with the machinations around. Yeah. That's kind of it.

And I mean, it's more of a Taylor Swift, myth. The Taylor with myth. Yes. Like the idea that she, you know, is doing anything special. Is kind of the myth. The myth is that anybody could probably write songs with her quality play music and her quality, but they don't have the marketing engine propping them up to become.

And so this is not more, this is less of a Taylor Swift problem and more of a pop music in general. Kind of thing. Like, you know, it's gotten a lot better recently because with the way music is distributed on the internet, now you have , um, artists that can go out. They don't need a label anymore. They can just go off and do their own thing.

And still somehow find their own following and find their audience. But you know, for this is something everybody knows, you know, for decades or music history, it didn't work like that. You had to get some guy to like you and play you on the radio. Otherwise nobody would have any idea who you were. And luckily we're kind of pulling away from that, but you still have that kind of art cake bones of the music industry doing their Taylor Swift's or doing their.

I don't know any marketing, marketing, you know, it's just a marketing product. I dunno. I'm just rambling. in his house for months, you know, anybody can, anybody can make music, right. Ben like, you know, and it's , uh, what makes the, I think the music different is like the vibe, the lyrics, . And then it would be the branding, you know?

And so that's really like, that's, it's not that complicated, you know, what do you think about this? Ben? Me, me. Oh man. Uh

it's the world is such a different place now. Like nobody's going to get on MTV, play their video. And have the world recognize them as on it, you know, like who are even the gatekeepers anymore. So, you know, gosh, like, you know, yeah. It's almost like somebody, somebody else.

Famous in that arena has to basically like tweet about you and say, I'm listening to this and it's really good. That's the one yeah. The age of influencers. Yeah. Right. Yeah. Um, right. So it's just so fundamentally different and , uh, You can really kind of like, you don't need wide spread appeal anymore, except for, you know, someone like a Taylor Swift or, you know, you've got people who are aiming for that, that gigantic widespread appeal, but you can get very, very specific of like, all right, the audience that I'm targeting are people who like this, and there's enough of them to support.

Me and I don't have to appeal to this mass broad audience. I can just appeal to people who like, you know, mass metal. Right, right. Which is cool. Math metal, you know? Yeah. Like metal, that's all just like, you know, super mathy tool or something. Okay, cool. Yeah. Right. Exactly. Yeah. Yeah. Uh, I always think of rush when I think of , which is almost the reason we started this podcast.

Right. Because like, we're kind of aware of that, but we don't really know. Does that make sense? Is that why we started this? Why did we start the, Oh gosh, I don't know. I really thought it was still like, you know, what's out, it's part of it was to help get our music out there, you know? Oh, right. Yeah, yeah.

Yeah. We thought it would be a fun, fun way to put something out. Why you talking about pizza and Marvel shows? That's right. Yeah, but you know, there's a little bit of music diversifying. Yeah. Talk about what we want to talk about. So our podcast, not yours, huh? Oh, I'm sorry. I'm making a joke.

People might get that. What does it find? There's these , uh, two drag Queens that do these YouTube videos called Trixie, Trixie, Mattel, and Katya. And they start every show like that. Like, you know, this is our show where we talk about anything we want because it's our podcast and not yours. Okay. Then they, yeah, they go into it.

Okay. Nice, good times. All right. If you had to put a bow on the born yesterday experience and what that was for you.

Because that was what, probably what like 2001 to 2005 for you? Yeah, that was probably about it. Yeah. I pretty sure I was 21. I was 21 in 2001 and I think I was 21 when I joined. So , so, you know, that's the equivalent of four years of college or four years of high school, which are, you know, important years for everybody.

So , uh, if you had a college yeah. If you had to put a bow on that experience for you. What, uh , what, what would that be? Um, I mean, would I do it again? Yeah, absolutely. I would do it again. Would I do things different at the time? Probably a little bit. You know, like we said earlier, if we'd had this conversation before we started the band, the band might've actually been a little more successful than it was, but you know, it was a learning process.

I mean, you know, it was fun to me, you know, we talked about everybody was in the band, kind of for a different reason. I just liked hanging out and. Playing music with people that were cool. I say friends, but you know, I didn't really know you until the band. I didn't, I mean, I guess I knew black men before, but I didn't, and I knew Ryan before, but I didn't know, you know, been lovely before.

And so it was like, you know, meeting new people, having fun, just, you know, if you can have fun and somehow also become successful, then I feel like you , you, you one life at that point now I'm not saying that we necessarily one life, but we had a good time, you know, doing what we did. I don't know if I have a really big takeaway from it other than , uh, you know, that's just, you know, some people, I feel like you see bands, you know, it was a bit bit about Taylor Swift earlier, but , uh, you know, they try to make music from a purely commercial standpoint.

Like, you know, I happen to be good at music, so I'm going to try to make music so I can make money and become successful. And that was never. You know, that would have been like a tertiary reason for me. Like if we have want to be good and become successful, that had been cool, but that wasn't the primary reason for it doing it.

Like I said, it's just, it's fun to hang out and make music and have people watching you and like you, and that was kind of all I, that was like the big thing I got out of it. It was fun to stand up on stage for. An hour and you know, maybe people and that's cool. Yay. And they did it like, you know , we, we had fans that we didn't realize we had an annual, maybe this podcast as a way we'll show up at people are searching for us, you know?

Um, because we were played on, on the local radio show, you know, a few times and yeah. Yeah. I mean, people voted for us every, every week. Apparently I don't even know how that worked, but we'd get played a lot. Yeah. Um, mud, we were number one, several weeks in a row, you know? . The DJ's. Mud. He let us know that.

And he was a banter. Mud was a fan. I remember that. So, so Jacob, I feel like your identity was wrapped up into born yesterday, more so than mine was certainly I don't want to speak for Mike.

Why don't you do yours first and then I'll then I'll wrap it up. So, yeah, I mean, like on the whole, I had a lot of fun. Uh, I got to , uh, you know, learn some songs and get up on stage and jump around like a fool. And , uh, we had a good time and sometimes there was a bunch of people in the audience and they really dug it.

And sometimes there weren't that many people in the audience and it was kind of like, whatever. Um, but I had a, I had a good time doing it and , um, , you know, it's , uh, I mean, it's really the only, the only band I've ever been in and I had a blessed , um, so yeah , uh, I think finally on that time and , um, Yeah.

But, but I also know that , like, I didn't, I didn't put into it as much as the two of you did and one, I apologize cause that's not fair. And to , um, uh , um, yeah , like, you know , as, as with any, you know, I guess 20 year old, you know, you're getting pulled in a lot of directions and I was trying to do, you know, A whole bunch of things all at the same time and it, you know, varying degrees of success.

So , um, yeah, I had a good time. I appreciate that time. And , uh, yeah, that's all I got. Yeah, no, I just , um, I had decided I really wanted to do music. Uh, I think it's like , uh, just a. Uh, like seriously, you know, after, after, you know, we both went to the, me and Ben went to a performing arts high school. So we were, we were S we were showing people that it actually like made a career out of theater and musicals and those kinds of things.

And , um, like music has always been new and dear to my heart, obviously. And I just, I wanted to make music. For a living. And I kind of wanted to do it a little bit out of spite because the music that was being taught to me was like a certain way, a certain genre, you know, and I kind of just wanted to just do it.

Um, and I don't know why I thought I could start a band. Um, honestly looking back, like there's no reason, like I wasn't that good, you know , uh, I wasn't good a singer wasn't that good a songwriter. I was none of those things, but I just wanted to. To express myself, you know? And , um, yeah, I was definitely more serious about it , uh, because of that , like, I just want him to do it and I wanted to do it like for a living.

I thought it was possible. Um, I was serious about writing songs. I had written songs when I was in school for , um, audio production. So I was writing songs out there and I just, I was like, man, it would be awesome if I could play these, you know, and , um, That's really where it started.

We went over this already. So after seeing Ryan, like that was really like, Oh man, this guy can really write songs. You know, like if we could get in a band, you know, we would be the shit, you know, so that's where it all started. And sort of, you know, it went down that path of what we talked about earlier and , um, No, I wish I would have had more of a cohesive vision, honestly.

Like even though I was serious about it, like I wish I would have had just a little bit more of a, of a vision and a little more like financial, common sense to make sure that we were making money because we could have got more money. Um, and I just, I was just so bad at it, you know? Um, at the time, you know, we were all young and , uh, there was nobody to.

Lead us like, it's, like you said, , we needed somebody to be like, here's the thing you need to do. You're next, you know? And , uh, we didn't have that. So we were all just sort of blind by the seat of our pants and , uh, yeah, that's all I got. Like now it's like , um, now it's more like, I want to make music that I can show to my kids if I ever have any, you know, like that's where I'm at now.

And , uh, to sum it up, like thank you for being in the band with me, because like there's no reason really like Mike, why you should have been in the band. Like I was probably too mean to you. Like there's no reason to say , uh, Ryan, I don't know why he joined the band.

He was way too talented. Uh, Ben you've got the most stage presence in the most like. Uh, like fun vibe, like you were just too cool. Honestly, you were too cool to be in the band. So like you guys really, even though we weren't like a cohesive unit, like you guys were the band and I just appreciate that. And it was a great time.

That was really like the funnest time. Uh, some of the best moments were playing on, on those stages. So that's all I got.

Awesome.

Jacob just said something so heartfelt. Now we don't know what to say to him. I know, right? That was you asked,

see, I got sear. This is, this was the problem. I always serious, you know, in the band and you guys. They weren't as serious, you know, that was the problem. Yeah. We had a naked drummer. We did have him dead. That was weird. He was in a punk band. No, why he wanted to do that and I don't even want to ask. Okay.

Let's be honest. Jason. Jason was buff. Okay. Yeah. You know, so he was buffed. So like, you know, if you got it, drummers, sweat, Yeah, it's hot. I mean, you think about onstage how we were hot and he's playing. Yeah , yeah, yeah. Uh, yeah. And yeah. Shout out, shout out to Jason too, because , uh, I don't, I don't, we couldn't have done it without him either. Like, you know , definitely, definitely.

Mike, you got anything to plug? That would be great. Um, I let's see, I'm not currently working on any projects. I'm not writing anything. I don't have a blog. I'm not on any other podcasts and I'm not creating anything. So no one checked my list. No, I don't have anything to plug, but if I do have something to plug, I'll definitely come back on and plug it.

Shout out to fatherhood. Yeah. Doing that. Um, uh, I do the dishes a lot and I do cook meals. So , um, there's, what's your go-to, what's your, what's your like , Oh, Oh, you're making this today. Mike's lasagna is the bomb. I've had that homemade, you know, it's funny, you mentioned that my Sonja is really good and I made it , um, Two nights ago, and I still have a little bit in the fridge.

I'm probably gonna eat some of that here. Um, it's nothing special. It's just lasagna, but I'm, I'm pretty good at it. It's pretty damn good at it. Um, I play a game called Eve online.

A lot of people do and , um, I don't really have much to say about it. Maybe at some point I would. Talk about in the future, but , um, yeah, I don't really have anything to say about it. It's a spaceship game. It's an MMO with spaceships. Um, the interesting thing about it as a game is , um, the majority of the content is player created as opposed to like, you know, world of Warcraft, you go and you fight , uh, A raid monster and everybody's fighting the same raid monster, and there's a story.

And all that here, you have like giant player controlled factions that are fighting Wars with each other. So all of the, the meta gaming has to do with actual people as opposed to worried about how to kill a boss. So that's what kind of, what makes it interesting. Um, Yeah, there's a currently a major war going on right now between two of the largest factions ever assemble in the game.

One of them are the , uh, Goonswarm and then the other group is called Pappy, which is a coalition of several different alliances, including my Alliance, which is called Testa Alliance. Please ignore. And , uh, we're fighting these giant spaceship battles. If you Google it, you'll see. All the news stories about it.

I could provide links later, just email. I love how you were like, look guys, I don't want to get into it. And then like, Three solid minutes of just condensed information. That was goodness. That was right. It's like literally the details. There's a lot more details on it. It's like, you know, I didn't want to get into it, but I wanted to give a broad overview.

So yeah, it's very tiny. Have you watched the , uh, have you watched the mythic quest TV show? Mythic quest. No, I have a nice, it is , uh, it's on the Apple TV. I won't see it. It's what's a it's Rob McElhaney from, it's always sunny. Oh yes. Uh, you write that down so I don't forget it. I saw , um, pre I saw like a trailer for it or something and I was like, Oh my God, that looks great.

Yeah, it is well-worth well worth your time. we don't watch a lot of current TV. We've been bingeing old TV shows. We've been watching the Mary Tyler Moore show. Whew. Which I seem to remember being a lot better when I was a kid. Um, it's very dated because it takes place in the, you know, the early seventies and just certain , um, The way women are portrayed and the way , um, you know, interactions between people are and the way the jobs are and stuff like that, it seems very antiquated.

So. Wild. Yeah. Yeah. I will tell you though, the most recent thing I've watched and if you guys haven't seen it yet, it's the Queen's Gambit. Netflix. I love it. It's really good. Can't get Ben to watch it. For some reason you haven't seen it. I've heard enough. You can't get Ben to watch it. It's on the list.

It's on the list. We just haven't gotten to the list. 11, you can watch true detective season three, skip that. I'm a little behind. Yeah. I understand. I still haven't watched breaking bad season four, so I never saw the breaking bad. Uh, I always get to a point on it where at, and I guess I'm going to go into a little bit of spoilers.

There was a part in it where wife finds out that his wife is cheating on him for the very first time scandal. I know. Right. And at that point in the show, it's so. Like that show is just, I like to watch TV to relax, but when you watch a show like breaking bad and you can't relax, cause everything is crazy and everyone's on the edge of their seat.

And you're just like, and so I get to a point where I'd been watching that show and I'm just like, I can't, I can't handle this anymore. I'm just gonna watch the office again for like the 50th time. So. That's kind of what happened to me with breaking bad and like, there's a lot of shows that are out there that are a lot more intense than a lot more realistic.

And I just I'm like, that's not why you want to watch cheers friends or something. You'd go back and rewatch. Cheers. I, yeah. That's that's on the list. Um, yeah. Yeah. Cheers. Cheers. Cheers. Binge on it. We're it's on Netflix. I believe. I think it is. Yeah, it's on somewhere because that's, we don't even before the, the, a lockdown, we weren't going out and doing a lot of things.

I mean, we, you know, we're older and we have a kid and , um, Our entertainment budget instead of spending money to go out to clubs and going out to bars and stuff like that, we would just stay at home and, you know, so I pay for Netflix, Hulu and Amazon prime. And, you know, that's what we do for entertainment.

We sit and watch TV. So I think a lot of people do that maybe even like closer to our age and younger or older or whatever. So. Just give me a shuttle and I'll at least try to pretend I'm going to watch it. You we're watching Mary Tyler Moore right now, but we don't really have anything queued up after that to watch.

So any suggestions is, you know, people tell me to watch things and I keep writing them on my list and eventually I'll get to them, I guess. So, yeah. Yeah. We're, we're doing the wand division. We got to lose on the fridge. Yeah. Oh, yeah. One division I heard was good. That's great. We're not, not big comic book people.

Like I used to work at a comic book shop when I was a kid and now I just, I don't care anymore. I don't care about the Marvel universe. I just there's too much out there now. Especially there's too much out there. The last Marvel movie I've seen has probably been iron man. Two ways to catch up. Wow. Yeah.

You're 28 movies behind. Yes exactly. Cause I remember , I put on the Avengers and I hadn't watched any, like I said, I've seen iron man, one iron man too. And that might be it. I don't even think I've seen the first captain America or anything. Right. And I turned on the Avengers and I got about 45 minutes into that movie and I was just like, I'm so lost.

I don't know who any of these people are. I don't know what any of them are doing. I don't know what the goal is. What am I doing here? It's like, people are like, they're fighting each other and I'm like, why are they fighting? I have no idea. So I just turned it off. And I think that was probably the last time I watched anything Marvel.

Yeah. It's I think it's worth it. Uh, you know, they're good, highly produced movies, you know, like. You know, they're all entertained. No, I'm sure they're all great. And I, one of these days I might get around to watching them, but I, I just had , yeah, yeah. The mood. You're not in the mood, not in the mood.

You're not in the mood. Yeah. Like I, I just been like, yeah, what were we saying? Uh, just to go back to the office , uh, Cause you, you mentioned that as one of your tos, the Robert California years. Yay or nay. Yay. Yay. Super Robert California is one of the funniest things they've ever had on that show. He's brilliant.

His presence. He, he lights up the screen and James Spader played that character perfectly so good. And he's just, he's just, he's literally insane. And when you watch the Robert California years, you see him just going crazier and crazier as the show goes on. Cause like, you know, he starts off and he's the new boss and he's a little.

Weird and intense, and nobody really knows anything about them, but the more you learn about at least competent. Yes, exactly. But the more you learn about the more you're just like, Oh my God, this guy is just a whack job. There's a whack job with like all the confidence in the world. And he just does things.

They got James Peter, and it's the boss. Yes. Yeah. Wow. After they had this rotating, they , um, the first one was, will Farrell. He was the boss for a little bit. And then , um, that didn't work out very well, so they just kept having other people be the boss and then they ended up settling on Andy being the boss for, I think until the, almost the end of the show, right?

Yeah. . Um, they ended the show with Dwight. I'm not going to say that. I think the office was better after Michael Scott left, but it's not as bad as people it's not as. Yeah, I agree. You got to see the other characters have a little bit more because it did the episode. Didn't have to revolve around Michael anymore.

So you could have other people to do weird, funny things without having to, okay. You always had to have this Michael a block going on. So yeah. I can talk about the office all day. So I have to have another podcast. Yeah, you could do a whole office podcast. There's uh, so many seasons of that show. How many, a nights do you think it was something like that?

And Michael's was the last one was seven or was it six? I don't remember now. Yeah. I think I may have watched the first five or something with you or, you know, or something like that. And I think that might be right. Yeah. The first season was weird because it was just a, basically a one for one with the British one.

They're worth a watch. And we don't watch them that often when we rewatch, in fact, a lot of the rewatch that we've done, we just started season two because everything's so different.

Um, what's between season one and the rest of the show, like the characters hadn't been really been fleshed out, like it was being, like I said before, it's being based on another show. And so it's a little bit more of that show than its own thing, but once it gets into its own, it really takes off and it becomes a definitely a good show.

Okay. So we wrapped up the born yesterday. We got the office. , we got another w we got it. We got big pizza too. We got pizza. Takes

Well thank you Mike, for being a guest. This has been fun. It's been fun. Thanks for having me. I'll come back my time. I don't have to talk about born yesterday. Obviously. I'll talk about whatever you want. Just tell me ahead of time. So I at least can know what I'm going to say.

So, all right. Cool. Yeah. Um, and uh, I think that's going to be, is that it? That's the end. Yeah, that sounds great. I'll play a boring, like a sign off thing you guys say. He says by, at the end, we can do a, we can play. Maybe we can play like a born yesterday song on the outro here. That's a good idea. Just for the record , uh, make sure you follow fake coleslaw on Twitter.

He posts once a year. And uh, thank you guys. I appreciate you, Mike. I appreciate you, Ben. Thanks for being here. Mike. Thank you, Jacob. Jacob, it's been a pleasure. Yeah, it's been fun. And talking about the band again and now it's been , uh, it's been awhile, so yeah. Body. I didn't do any sharing comments. That's fine. People know how to share, share stuff like subscribe, smash that like button box master, like button. All right. Thank you.

 
Is This Entertainment?
Is This Entertainment?
BORN YESTERDAY: Our old local band that went from the basement to the attic 🎸 | ITE Ep 15 w/Mike
/

Subscribe to our newsletter now!

>